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Echo vs Stihl

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  • #16
    I have 2 echo 210 string trimmers.... Yeah they want for power in real thick stuff, but are light enough to hold all day long & have enough power for most applications, I also have a 260 on the trailer for the really tall stubborn crap.
    Muahahaha "Say hello to my little friend".

    The echos have been pretty good, Though I'd like to ask a question of you guys.... When we are in the groove, my crew & I are doing properties in 9-12 minutes, shut the gear down, drive 2 minutes, run for 9 more, shut down, etc.... When they get heated up they can be a tempormental P.I.A. to keep running. Do you expericance this with these other brands? Are you running them Like I run mine? Or is this an echo problem!?

    My guess is they all do it when abused like this. I know the 210 is really a light-commercial machine but... the 260 does it too sometimes.

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    • #17
      Stihl is a 4 mix engine NOT a 4 cycle engine big difference. Its still 2 cycle, it takes a 50:2 gas and oil mix.
      Sorry to burst your bubble, but the ONLY part of your statement that is correct is that the 4-mix engine uses mixed fuel. The rest of your statement is incorrect, including the mix ratio. Now I am sure the mix ratio part could possibly have been a typo, but the correct mix ratio is 50:1, not 50:2. In your words, "big difference", one (50:2) is essentially 25:1, while the other is 50:1.

      Now for the part where you are entirely incorrect:

      Stihl is a 4 mix engine NOT a 4 cycle engine big difference. Its still 2 cycle,
      Stihl's 4-mix engine IS a 4 cycle (aka 4 Stroke).

      Stihl's website says:
      The revolutionary STIHL 4-MIX® engine is the first mixture-lubricated 4-stroke engine from STIHL and combines the advantages of 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines in a single unit. Unlike conventional 4-stroke engines, which require separate systems for the fuel supply and engine lubrication, the new STIHL 4-MIX® engine is fuelled with the new 4-MIX® fuel mixture.......
      Here is another direct quote from Stihl's website where it discusses their 4-mix engine:
      Patented low emissions 4-stroke engine that uses 50:1, 2-stroke fuel-oil mix for engine lubrication, eliminating need for seperate oil reservoir
      The engine does use fuel that is normally considered 2 stroke fuel. But 4 stroke deals with the way an engine runs, not the type of lubrication system it uses (gasoline+oil mixture). A 2 cycle (aka 2 stroke) engine fires every time the cylinder comes to top dead center. Thus its name, '2 stroke'. The piston goes dwn from top dead center and back up, that is 2 strokes.

      On the other hand, a 4 cycle (aka 4 stroke) fires every other time the cylinder comes to top dead center.

      Here is a little education for those folks who are not familiar with the operation of a 4 stroke engine. Once the engine fires (at top dead center on compression stroke) it pushes the piston down to bottom dead center. This is called the power stroke. The piston then goes back up on the exhaust stroke, pushing all the exhaust fumes from the "explosion" out through the exhaust valve and muffler. We are at 2 strokes so far. Now the piston goes back down to bottom dead center on the intake stroke (it draws a new mixture of fuel and air into the combsution chamber). We are at 3 strokes now. The piston now goes back up on compression stroke (so named because it compresses the fuel+air mixture in the combustion chanber) and fires near top dead center. The compression stroke was the 4th stroke. We now start over on our 4 stroke cycle: power stroke, exhaust stroke, intake stroke, and compression stroke.

      With this being said, the 4-mix fires every other time the piston comes to top dead center. This is the only way an engine with conventional valves (like are used with the 4-mix engine) can operate.

      And I still contend that 4 stroke engines, no matter the lubrication style, will be able to produce the same amount of power as a 2 cycle of the same size (not that anyone was disagreeing that I know of). This has nothing to do with oil ratio, etc, but rather with physics. Since a 2 stroke fires everytime the piston hits top dead center it receives power everytime it hits top dead center. Since a 4 stroke only fires every other time it only receives power every other time..... Sound simple? it is

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