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  • Snow Plow

    I know it is early, but winter will be here soon enough. I'm looking to put a plow on my truck this year and can't decide which one. The biggest local dealer here does Boss, and I ran Boss with a company I used to work for. I am not convinced though that they are necessarily the best plow out there.

    I would be looking at one with expanding wings. Boss has this, but they only expand out and you can't change the angle. I like the Sno-way 29R or Sno-way HD Revolution because the wings can be angled independently. I actually have a Sno-way dealer close to my, but I never see anyone around here running Sno-way. Is that for a reason? They don't look as heavy duty as the Boss or even most other brands in general. I think they only have 2 springs, while most have 4-6.

    Anyone run a Sno-way or have in the past that can tell me their experience with it? Also, any idea on pricing for a Sno-way HD Revolution?

    On a side note, anyone know about running a plow on a 2005 F-350 6.0L? I've read online that you have to have the plow prep package, but others say the 6.0 already has everything the plow prep package would have, except for a different fan clutch. I talked to my mechanic (who specializes in 6.0Ls) and he said it would do just fine, but Sno-way website says they require the plow prep package for 04 and up 6.0 L.

  • #2
    I've read online that you have to have the plow prep package
    From what I can tell these prep packages can include heavier front springs, larger alternator, heavier front springs, and depending on the year of the truck a software upgrade to change the setting of the radiator fan so that it will engage more at low speeds.

    Some packages may come with electrical harnesses too.

    I would guess you could always change the front springs if you felt there was a problem.

    Maybe you would need a larger alternator if the plow requires it?

    Here is a review on the sno-way plow.
    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/74WTdIMJQ78" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    Also a negative review of the sno-way plow here.
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    • #3
      From what I can tell these prep packages can include heavier front springs, larger alternator, heavier front springs, and depending on the year of the truck a software upgrade to change the setting of the radiator fan so that it will engage more at low speeds.

      Some packages may come with electrical harnesses too.

      I would guess you could always change the front springs if you felt there was a problem.

      Maybe you would need a larger alternator if the plow requires it?

      Here is a review on the sno-way plow.
      <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/74WTdIMJQ78" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

      Also a negative review of the sno-way plow here.
      This was my understanding of the plow prep package as well. However, my truck is Diesel, so from what I understand it already has the larger alternator and heavier front springs. The only other thing I heard was that the fan clutch would wait too long for the engine to get too hot before kicking in when adding the extra weight of the plow. I guess with it being Diesel, some people say it could blow the EGR easily. Luckily for me, I deleted the EGR from my truck and converted the electric fan back to the older style mechanical fan found on the 7.3L Diesels, that operates much more efficiently.

      But when I looked on Sno-way's website, it very specifically said that 04 and up Ford 6.0L need the plow prep package. So I am guessing this is due to the overheating issues with the fan clutch which I have already addressed. These engines are notorious for overheating without a plow or trailer in tow, so I guess Sno-way is being cautious.

      Thanks for the reviews, I searched Google and could only find stuff put out by Sno-way, so it is obviously going to be biased.

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      • #4
        Couldn't you keep an eye on the temp gauge to see if something else needed to be done when using your plow?
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        • #5
          Couldn't you keep an eye on the temp gauge to see if something else needed to be done when using your plow?
          I can, but the issue is that with the Ford 6.0L, there are multiple fail points in the engine. They are known for studs failing, egr blowing, oil cooler failing, cooling system failure, ficm blowing, and more.

          Most people with these engines Bulletproof them. This is a process of eliminating or upgrading all the fail points in the engine to avoid them. I have started down this road myself. I recently had the FICM replaced, but unfortunately it was an OEM because it was through warranty. So it will hopefully last for a while, but not as long as it should. I also had my EGR deleted, where they just take it out all together. The EGR recycles hot gases from the exhaust and puts them back into the engine, since a Diesel uses hot air to run. However, the EGR commonly fails and the truck is able to actually operate without it, with no performance loss. I guess the inclusion of an EGR was probably more so to appease the EPA rather than out of actual necessity. The truck is currently in the shop getting new brakes, new A/C hoses, and the engine fan replaced. Replacing the engine fan should help with the overheating issues as well. Part of the snow plow prep package was to change out the fan clutch with one that kicks on more frequently and at a lower temp threshold. I asked my mechanic to switch to this, and his response was that all of the fans on the 6.0L are junk and he is switching it out to a different system. He is actually installing a conversion to put on a fan assembly from a 7.3L. The 7.3L was the engine before the 6.0L and is arguably one of the best diesel engines ever. Unfortunately the EPA killed its production and forced Ford to switch to the 6.0L. But the mechanic is putting a mechanical fan on my 6.0L from a 7.3L, which is suppose to cool much better than the electrical fan.

          With all that being said, I still need to switch out the FICM power module, redo the studs, upgrade the engine oil cooler with a half kit, and change to lifetime head gaskets. I am looking at about another $4000 in work, but at that point I should have a diesel that produces a good amount of HP (best in HP and torque for when it was in production) and should be good to go until 300,000-500,000 miles without any major issues.

          As far as monitoring temps in the meantime, that requires a Monitor station, which runs anywhere from $500-$1000. The stations are able to monitor every temperature independently to see what is going to fail next/first. The engine temp gauge simply monitors the coolant temperature.

          Thanks

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          • #6
            Great insights! Keep us posted on which plow you decide to go with and I'd love to hear your review of it when you get a chance to use it.
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