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Stupid Chainsaw!!!

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  • #16
    That video is crazy! It's amazing how much work is involved in sharpening them!

    Andy, what tool do you use to sharpen them? I have had tried using like a Dremel to do it.

    From here.

    No I use a round file, about 3 to 4 min and I can give you big chips, a new employeem five tries and they will generally get it right.
    Andy
    Halifax, Nova Scotia

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    • #17
      How many times can you sharpen a chain saw blade until it needs to be replaced?
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      • #18
        How many times can you sharpen a chain saw blade until it needs to be replaced?
        We run ours until there is about 3/16th of an inch of tooth left, as the tooth gets shorter you sharpen more often, mainly due to heat.
        Andy
        Halifax, Nova Scotia

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        • #19
          Not understanding Eli's comment, but maybe he can make sense of it. I know that Stihl is the only of the 3 he mentioned that DOESN'T have a consumer grade. Husqvarna is sold throughout Home Depot and Lowes, Not too sure about Jonsered though. Stihl is only sold through dealers and not box stores. Can you elaborate on your comment? Thanks
          Northern California

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          • #20
            Not understanding Eli's comment, but maybe he can make sense of it. I know that Stihl is the only of the 3 he mentioned that DOESN'T have a consumer grade. Husqvarna is sold throughout Home Depot and Lowes, Not too sure about Jonsered though. Stihl is only sold through dealers and not box stores. Can you elaborate on your comment? Thanks
            You are exactly right in that Stihl is only sold through Dealers. I believe, though I am not 100% positive on this, but I believe that Jonsered is sold through dealers alone as well.

            But what I was getting at was the quality of the saw, not where they are sold. For the most part you used to be able to tell by the model number whether or not a particular model Stihl was a consumer or commercial grade. It is still relatively easy once you understand their model # designation system.

            Example:

            Stihl models 021, 023, 025, 029, etc are consumer grade saws (not the model #s are "odd numbers" as opposed to even #s). To my knowledge the MS210, MS230, MS250, MS290, etc are just the newer model designations of the same saws and thus are still Consumer quality.

            Stihl models 036, 044, MS360, MS440 are Professional models... These are "even numbered" models and historically this designated Pro models. Just some food for thought when you go to buy a new saw.

            To answer Steve's question regarding why chains get dull quickly when you hit dirt and certain other substances, consider this. Dirt is comprised of many small rocks/sand/grit, whatever you want to call it. Essentially these are "sand paper" but just without the paper. When you hit frozen dirt, these grits do not move as easily as loose dirt does and become more like sandpaper. So basically, to answer the question, anything that is grit or contains grit will cause your chain to become dull quickly. Thus if your wood is dirty, muddy, etc. it will quickly dull your chain.

            Once you learn how to properly sharpen a chain by hand you should be able to make it just as sharp as it was from new. Depending on how dull it was, and how sharp your file is, it may take anywhere from 2 to who knows how many strokes of the file to sharpen the chain. There is no "it will take this many strokes" to sharpen the chain....

            Now regarding how far back to sharpen a chain, I would definitely not recommend sharpening it back farther than the red mark I placed on the photo. I would personally recommend stopping a bit sooner. I have seen chains sharpened beyond this line. Keep in mind that when you do sharpen beyond this red line, that you risk having the teeth break off since there is considerably less strength there to hold the tooth in place. If you choose to sharpen beyond the safe limits I showed, you take that risk on your own.

            Good luck,
            Eli
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