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  • Shrub & Tree Trimming bidding

    This is one of the hardest for me to bid on. How in the world do you go about looking at a bush such as an oleander and bid on it on trimming and halling off the clippings? Some are large some are small. Some trees need a few branches cut while others need more. Then the rose bush is over in the corner, followed by a boxwood. Then on the other side of the property there is sago palm, or palm tree? Some shrubs need square while some are round!!

    1. How do you bid this out on one property with different variety?
    2. How or where do you learn to shape bushes?
    3. How do you keep the bushes from looking bare when it has not been trimmed in a while? This happens when they want them cut round when the were square for an example?

    Look forward to hearing from you pros out there. Maybe it is just a time issue. I have all the equipment just want to make sure I use it well.

    Thanks for your help.

  • #2
    1. How do you bid this out on one property with different variety?
    2. How or where do you learn to shape bushes?
    3. How do you keep the bushes from looking bare when it has not been trimmed in a while? This happens when they want them cut round when the were square for an example?

    Look forward to hearing from you pros out there. Maybe it is just a time issue. I have all the equipment just want to make sure I use it well.

    Thanks for your help.
    1. I bid hedge rows by the foot. The rate per foot is dependent on the height. Individual shrubs are bid on size and complexity. I take into account if I have to hand prune or will use motorized hedge trimmers

    2. Read. There are a ton of great books on proper prunning techniques and styles. Also check out local, state and national landscape and arborist organizations. They usually have a wealth of information

    3. Educate your clients. Some things just cant be undone. Dont get me wrong you can do alot with smart pruning, but a 10 foot tall juniper bush cant be made into a 3 foot tall juniper bush without either killing it or destroying its look. Also educate yourself. If you tell a client that this bush is a (insert common name or scientific name) and this is how it should be maintained and this is what I can do. You look like a professional and they will value your expertise.

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    • #3
      1. I bid hedge rows by the foot. The rate per foot is dependent on the height. Individual shrubs are bid on size and complexity. I take into account if I have to hand prune or will use motorized hedge trimmers

      2. Read. There are a ton of great books on proper prunning techniques and styles. Also check out local, state and national landscape and arborist organizations. They usually have a wealth of information

      3. Educate your clients. Some things just cant be undone. Dont get me wrong you can do alot with smart pruning, but a 10 foot tall juniper bush cant be made into a 3 foot tall juniper bush without either killing it or destroying its look. Also educate yourself. If you tell a client that this bush is a (insert common name or scientific name) and this is how it should be maintained and this is what I can do. You look like a professional and they will value your expertise.
      Thank you for the information. I did not know about where to even find the information so you have got pointed me in a direction. I have a customer that wants me to bid on 6 sagos and looking at the size and placement I can have them cut and loaded in 45 minutes! The site is not far away. I have been told that this is where the money is so I just want to make sure that I am fair to the customer but at the same time I am making money. Again thank you so much for taking the time to help answer my question.

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      • #4
        1. I bid hedge rows by the foot. The rate per foot is dependent on the height. Individual shrubs are bid on size and complexity. I take into account if I have to hand prune or will use motorized hedge trimmers
        Do you have any examples you could share to give everyone some kind of idea where to start?
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        • #5
          Do you have any examples you could share to give everyone some kind of idea where to start?
          Sure Steve,

          Hedge rows 50cents to $2 a linear foot based on height. For individual shrubs I figure $5 for those under knee height. $10-$15 for knee to sholder height. $20 and up for those taller then 6foot. If I have a complete landscape I will discount the final amount because of the efficiencies of working in one place. On top of this amount I will add a disposal fee if I need to make a dump run. For prunning the prices are similar but usually a few dollars more per size.

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          • #6
            Thank you. This gives me something to work with.
            Sure Steve,

            Hedge rows 50cents to $2 a linear foot based on height. For individual shrubs I figure $5 for those under knee height. $10-$15 for knee to sholder height. $20 and up for those taller then 6foot. If I have a complete landscape I will discount the final amount because of the efficiencies of working in one place. On top of this amount I will add a disposal fee if I need to make a dump run. For prunning the prices are similar but usually a few dollars more per size.

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            • #7
              Hedge rows 50cents to $2 a linear foot based on height.
              How should this price differ if the shrub is 3 ft high vs. 6 ft high?
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              • #8
                How should this price differ if the shrub is 3 ft high vs. 6 ft high?
                This is were pricing becomes more of an art then a science. It really depends on the type of shurbs, access, and how easy they will be to clean up etc. I use my experience to determine this number. I should probably come up with a matrix to make it easier as my company grows.


                Jay

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                • #9
                  if im having a hard time deciding what to charge for a pruning job i will just charge for a half day or full day based on my hourly rate plus dumping fees even if im only there for six hours or seven my day is pretty much shot

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                  • #10
                    if im having a hard time deciding what to charge for a pruning job i will just charge for a half day or full day based on my hourly rate plus dumping fees even if im only there for six hours or seven my day is pretty much shot
                    So are there times when you will be on a job for 6 or 7 hours and still bill for a full day (8 hours) because you can't schedule any other work in?
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                    • #11
                      yes i sure do and i will put my labour costs for the day but not break it down to my hourly rate or hours spent at the job

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                      • #12
                        yes i sure do and i will put my labour costs for the day but not break it down to my hourly rate or hours spent at the job
                        Could you share with us the theory behind this? A lot of new business owners probably don't understand this concept.
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                        • #13
                          Sago Trimming

                          Down here in Texas we had a hard winter. Most of the sago Palm leaves are brown. I have seen some that have cut them back all the way while others are doing nothing. The three I have in my yard have just a little bit of green at the start of the stem but brown on 95% of the rest.

                          Do you trim them all the way off or what?

                          Thank you for your help.

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                          • #14
                            From what I've read on it, when trimming, you should cut as close to the trunk as possible. This will encourage new leaves to emerge also.
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                            • #15
                              From what I've read on it, when trimming, you should cut as close to the trunk as possible. This will encourage new leaves to emerge also.
                              Thank you Steve. Got to take care of one of my customers and wanted to make sure.

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