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Commercial bid need help ASAP

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  • Commercial bid need help ASAP

    Hi, I hope that everyone is having a good start with their business. My business is starting to pick up and I have a bid for three dental offices and a residential owned by the dental group. One office has about 45618 sq ft to be cut,edged and trimmed. Another 23,587 Sq ft is parking lot that has to be blown. They also have 21 large bushes that need to be trimmed and maintained, 76 small bushes, 1xxx large bush and 2 Crepe Myrtles. Does anyone have any ideas about how much to charge for this particular job. I need a reply ASAP because I have to submit this tomorrow.

  • #2
    The first thing you need to do is break this job down into parts.

    For instance, what do you charge per sqft for mowing?

    Have you calculated that out yet? Can you take a larger property you currently service, figure out how many sq ft it has and then divide it by how much you are charging?

    What did you come up with when you did that?

    It's important when you do something like this, you don't base a larger job's price on a multiple of a smaller job if that smaller job is underbid. Because if you do that, your larger bid will REALLY be underbid.
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    • #3
      Commercial bid

      Steve, what I did was use the calculator/estimate tool. I entered the sq footage and it said that I should charge 127.43, but I took into consideration all the shrubs that needed trimming and I read on another post that another company said that they charge about 80.00 per hour. The calculator tool said that it should take me 94 mins, so I bid that property at 150.00 per visit. what do you think? Can you be more specific about how to break down the jobs?

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      • #4
        When you come up with such a figure and this is all new to you, I would suggest presenting the estimate in person. Feel out how the customer reacts to your bid. If they flinch and feel it is too much, you can always ask them, what they would need to go with the job right now. If they give you a figure and it is still within your range, great, go with that one. Or haggle a bit and try to get it as high as possible.

        Know what your absolute low figure is. Don't go below that. But allow yourself some room to experiment now with your pricing.

        Keep track of how long the job takes and what you charged. Figure out how much you were making per hour and then start applying that to other jobs in the future.
        - Subscribe to my Lawn Care Marketing Blog Feed and get daily tips sent to you. Free!
        Download your Free trial of Gopher Lawn Care Software.

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