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  • Over seeding advice

    About 3 weeks ago I over seeded 1/3rd of my back yard (about 2500 SqFt). I cut what little of the existing grass was left to about 1" and then covered the entire area with a layer a new top soil. Rented an overseeder machine from homedepot and put down the seed. I followed the instructions and went over the area being planted in 2 passes perpendicular to each other. I have been watering 2 times a day when it's not raining and grass is coming up VERY thin. Last weekend I threw down some more seed with a broadcast spreader but rain washed the seed away as this part of the lawn is not flat.

    So do I just wait a few more weeks and see how it goes?

    How long do I need to let the new seedlings establish before I can use the over seeder again without killing the young grass?

    FWIW the area gets pretty good sun exposure, I used a starter fertilizer with pre-emergent and the grass seed was a blend of tall fescue (rebels) and Kentucky blue grass.

  • #2
    From what I know, Kentucky Blue Grass can take 4-8 weeks to germinate. So with that in mind, I'd say you still have some time before you are going to see majority of your seeds sprout.

    Keep us posted on it.
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    • #3
      this "pre-emergent" you used....was it a weed preventer pre-emergent?

      I'm not super familiar with bluegrass, but rather fescue. It can't hurt to throw some seed out by hand, however. Be sure not to over water. You just want to keep the seedlings moist until they germinate, then water regularly. At least with fescue, not sure how different bluegrass should be treated.

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      • #4
        The product was Scotts starter fertilizer with crab grass preventative

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        • #5
          Good point on making sure you don't over water it.

          Give it a little more time and you should see more growth. Keep us posted on it. Also you should be taking pictures for your marketing material/website. Then you will have before/after pics of your overseeding service!
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          • #6
            Is over watering an issue?

            My understanding is if the seed is not constantly wet it will not germinate.

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            • #7
              From what I understand you can't use a pre-emergant like the Scotts crabgrass preventive when putting down seed. It prevents things from coming up, grass seed included.

              You might have killed all your seed or most of it by doing this.

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              • #8
                Over watering is the biggest issue for non-sprouting seeds. Grass seed needs water but you should not soak it. Same goes for sod. By letting it dry out for a day or two it lets the roots grow down in search of moisture. I have seen that mistake alot with sod the following spring when it is completely dead. When we inspect the sod the roots are barely below the sod level making it die from shallow roots during winter.

                I advise never to fertilize new grass seed. It can either help or kill all the seed. We have found that it is better to wait on the grass to come up and fertilize it around the time it is ready to be mowed. From that point forward it will fill in and grow fast! We have planted acres of seed this way. It takes some time to get the seed up and growing but with the price of seed so high its the safest bet. Hope this helps!

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                • #9
                  Are there any more updates to this? It has been 10 days since you initially posted about the lawn so it would be interesting to hear if there has been any change.

                  Here is some great information on fertilizing new lawns. A lot of great information.
                  http://www.lawnfertilizers.com/#New%20Lawn
                  Lawn Starter Fertilizers - New Lawns - Planting Seed, Sod Or Grass Plugs

                  Seed plantings require a different fertilizer analysis content than do established lawns. Seedlings that are germinating need phosphorus and potassium to build healthy and strong roots. Newly sodded, sprigged or plugged lawns need to build root growth also. Nitrogen is used in the foliage part of the plant. The higher degree of nitrogen can always be added later but phosphorus and potassium need to be in the soil from the beginning.

                  Lawn Starter fertilizers need to be worked into the seedbed as one of the last steps before planting and these will contain a balanced blend of the three most necessary ingredients, nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus for a health beginning. Many more elements are needed besides the main three and soil tests are conducted for this.

                  Always avoid the use of any of the weed & feed fertilizers with new seeding or sodding. These may work great for spring use on established lawns, but the chemicals used in these fertilizers can damage or kill your newly planted grass while it is attempting to establish itself in its new home (your soil).
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