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  • #16
    Bed Work

    Here is just one small area of a bed that needs work. This is what caused me to post on the forum.

    Lot's and lot's of work to do here.
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    • #17
      i can agree with you to some point but the type of properties you maintain can blow that theory right out of the water.

      working for someone to learn the trade is not so much to learn the basic functions of the equipment because you can show someone all they need to know in 15 minutes, off course they would have to develop the fine skills but that is all the easy part and comes fairly quickly to the right individual.

      the experience i am referring to would be knowledge of turf with the pests, weeds and diseases and different varieties of grasses.
      obtaining licenses if applicable in the state you live in is so much easier when you work for someone because the hours you work count as your basic training.
      you get to learn more about pricing and time to do jobs because as most know every landscape is different you get to learn how to work with other people and learn to deal with others baggage.
      if you have a good boss you get to learn how to be a boss and even if he stinks you can get a good picture of what not to do as a boss.

      there are so many priceless things to learn while on someone elses dime that help in the long haul.

      my original post was more as a advice to potential future business owners then towards anyone who is allready up and running and even though i quoted the OP it was not to lambast him.

      everyone situation is different and if you are allready balls deep in your business then i am no way suggesting sell the farm and go work for someone and then start over again.
      i am not saying that just because you never worked for no one there is no way you can not be good at what you do, because that is up to the particular individual and his deire to thrive and be the best he can be.

      all i am saying is two things 1. there are to paths you can take, the high road and the low road. and both lead to the same destination if you work hard but one way will obviously take more effort.
      2. if you are starting out take your time whats the rush, if it something you plan on doing the rest of your life you will have plenty of time for your own glory and by fine tuning your skills and knowledge on someone elses dime will only better aid you in when you start off hitting the ground running.
      And you are right in a turn key operation. All is good and thank you much for the comment. Blessings to you in all you do my friend.

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      • #18
        i can agree with you to some point but the type of properties you maintain can blow that theory right out of the water.

        working for someone to learn the trade is not so much to learn the basic functions of the equipment because you can show someone all they need to know in 15 minutes, off course they would have to develop the fine skills but that is all the easy part and comes fairly quickly to the right individual.

        the experience i am referring to would be knowledge of turf with the pests, weeds and diseases and different varieties of grasses.
        obtaining licenses if applicable in the state you live in is so much easier when you work for someone because the hours you work count as your basic training.
        you get to learn more about pricing and time to do jobs because as most know every landscape is different you get to learn how to work with other people and learn to deal with others baggage.
        if you have a good boss you get to learn how to be a boss and even if he stinks you can get a good picture of what not to do as a boss.

        there are so many priceless things to learn while on someone elses dime that help in the long haul.

        my original post was more as a advice to potential future business owners then towards anyone who is allready up and running and even though i quoted the OP it was not to lambast him.

        everyone situation is different and if you are allready balls deep in your business then i am no way suggesting sell the farm and go work for someone and then start over again.
        i am not saying that just because you never worked for no one there is no way you can not be good at what you do, because that is up to the particular individual and his deire to thrive and be the best he can be.

        all i am saying is two things 1. there are to paths you can take, the high road and the low road. and both lead to the same destination if you work hard but one way will obviously take more effort.
        2. if you are starting out take your time whats the rush, if it something you plan on doing the rest of your life you will have plenty of time for your own glory and by fine tuning your skills and knowledge on someone elses dime will only better aid you in when you start off hitting the ground running.
        I agree with all of this. There is no substitute for the proper experience. All I meant to add was that the right person with the right attitude can still get most of the way there (although it is a more difficult road). I could have worded my previous statement better than I did.
        Evansville Lawn Mowing
        Newburgh Lawn Care

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        • #19
          Just a thought...

          Mowing is fine, but why swim with the sharks. Everyone mows and drives the price down. Search your market and determine where the least competition is. Learn the skills needed to enter the market; start small, price to be profitable, develop a reputation, and capture market share. I am a small company. We do not touch a project for less than $50 per man hour, plus material, and disposal fees.

          The extras are where the money is, educate and develop a small customer base positioning yourself as the expert and one stop shop for lawn and landscape service. If someone needs you ahead of regular scheduling, charge a premium. My labor rate raises to $60 per man hour on emergency projects.

          So far as the posts concerning bad attitudes from the competition, work on relationships. I have developed a relationship with a large landscape company. They provide me leads that they cannot service because of its size. They provide me with leads for mowing that they do not provide and for jobs that are too small for them to bother with. Also, I have developed relationships with mowing companies to prune their customers trees and landscape. I spif them and everyone is happy. This business thrives of healthy relationships- customers and competition.

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