Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mowing the hills

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Do you have a general preference between belt drive and hydro? Does that preference change at all when it involved mowing hills?
    I currently have both, and prefer the hydro any day over the belt drive. Just has more control. Luckily the belt drive is a 36" and I don't use it very much.

    When mowing hills, belt drives are awful and I'd rather use a push mower. Just too much going on at once trying to drive / freewheel / brake. If a linkage is out of adjustment or a belt is slipping it just makes it that much worse.

    Comment


    • #17
      Belt drive: Has wide belts connecting the transmission output pulleys to the wheels and relies on belt tension to go and stop. Reversing done with transmission lever (although I can honestly say I've never used reverse on the belt drive).

      Hydro drive: Has separate pumps and wheel motors for the drive wheels. Individual control, including instant reversing for each wheel via the hand levers (controls varies with manufacturer).

      Hey, thanks for this explanation. I might not understand it all right now, but that is changing the more I delve into this endeavor. So again thanks, I will have this explanation to look back on when I need it as soon as we start looking for our upgrades ... Hoping that is sooner rather than later

      Comment


      • #18
        I currently have both, and prefer the hydro any day over the belt drive.
        Have you found this to be the case across the board regardless of the type of mower (ztr, walk behind, etc)? Or was one type of drive system better for one type of mower design?
        - Subscribe to my Lawn Care Marketing Blog Feed and get daily tips sent to you. Free!
        Download your Free trial of Gopher Lawn Care Software.

        Comment


        • #19
          Have you found this to be the case across the board regardless of the type of mower (ztr, walk behind, etc)? Or was one type of drive system better for one type of mower design?
          Technically a hydro walk behind IS a zero turn but I think you mean a belt drive rider ztr? I never knew they existed (and technically couldn't because the ability to reverse one wheel independently from the other is what makes it "zero turn") but I guess they somehow could. Belt drive wb's are fine (to me) for anything except hills. I ran belt drive Ransome / Bobcats for years and never had a major issue. I think one trans in 4 years if memory serves me right. Which brings up another point - repair costs. Belt drives are relatively cheap to fix compared to a hydro, but a hydro will give years of service without an issue. If you or your guys hammer on the equipment, either one will give you grief.

          Comment


          • #20
            Just look at the photo link below. Riders are great but as soon as the weight shifts to the front tires you get in to trouble.


            http://blogsdir.cms.rrcdn.com/5/file...al-320x607.jpg

            Comment


            • #21
              WOW talk about something right out of a horror movie! These are great pictures to illustrate the dangers of mowing inclines. I do hope the operator of that mower walked away unharmed.
              - Subscribe to my Lawn Care Marketing Blog Feed and get daily tips sent to you. Free!
              Download your Free trial of Gopher Lawn Care Software.

              Comment


              • #22
                Here is another accident of a mower flipping over after sliding down a hillside. Notice the roll over protection structure. Either it snapped or it wasn't fully extended.

                It must have flipped and landed upside down with a lot of force. The front wheels are just barely sticking out of the ground. Can you imagine what that would do to someone under it?



                Landscaper pinned under lawn tractor.
                Attached Files
                - Subscribe to my Lawn Care Marketing Blog Feed and get daily tips sent to you. Free!
                Download your Free trial of Gopher Lawn Care Software.

                Comment


                • #23
                  That is very disturbing to see something like this.

                  I would hope that the operator jumped off before it flipped.

                  Ya know, if you think about it, when we are mowing we rarely think about these things until its almost too late. It would be a situation where you would have to think quickly to even jump off the machine...You would have to get the control arms into the neutral positions just to get off of it, then you would have to clear the mower so it didn't run over you. I think you would be very lucky to be able to do one or the other, let alone both...

                  Scary even thinking about this!!!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Here is another accident of a mower flipping over after sliding down a hillside. Notice the roll over protection structure. Either it snapped or it wasn't fully extended.

                    It must have flipped and landed upside down with a lot of force. The front wheels are just barely sticking out of the ground. Can you imagine what that would do to someone under it?



                    Landscaper pinned under lawn tractor.
                    Just yet another reason I never lower my roll bar. I'd much rather have it clanking around over every bump and walk away if something like this ever happens. You just never know.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Just yet another reason I never lower my roll bar.
                      What is your thoughts on why operators lower their roll bars? Is it to get under trees? To transport? Why?
                      - Subscribe to my Lawn Care Marketing Blog Feed and get daily tips sent to you. Free!
                      Download your Free trial of Gopher Lawn Care Software.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        What is your thoughts on why operators lower their roll bars? Is it to get under trees? To transport? Why?
                        Honestly, I have no idea. I've never seen that short of an enclosed trailer that required the bar to be lowered to transport.

                        People also fail to realize these things can and will roll over on a level surface.

                        Comment

                        Bottom Ad Widget

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X