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  • If.......

    If you had say, $100,000 cash, what would you do with it?

    Invest it in a business (or upgrade the one you have)?

    Or would you pay off your house?


    What if you had $1,000,000??????

    And this is based on your current status and tomorrow you had this amount in your bank?


    I have been thinking about what I would buy for my business with $100,000. Better building, install a mower lift, bring in one or two lines of equipment.

    And then QUIT MY FULL TIME JOB!!!!! lol

    What would you do?

  • #2
    100k

    If you had say, $100,000 cash, what would you do with it?

    Invest it in a business (or upgrade the one you have)?

    Or would you pay off your house?


    What if you had $1,000,000??????

    And this is based on your current status and tomorrow you had this amount in your bank?


    I have been thinking about what I would buy for my business with $100,000. Better building, install a mower lift, bring in one or two lines of equipment.

    And then QUIT MY FULL TIME JOB!!!!! lol

    What would you do?
    1. 6 months expenses to cover bills if by chance have no income $7,000.00
    2. Closeout on my house $9,200.00
    3. 24 x 30 storage building $11,000.00
    4. John Deere 749 with tiller, box blade, mulcher, stump grinder, etc. $20,000.00
    $100,000.00 - $47,200 = $52,800.00

    $25,000.00 set aside for any special opportunities that may come along.

    Leaves $27,800.00

    Balance on assorted inventory and equipment.

    Steve


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    • #3
      Do I need to say it?


      LOL
      Boughter's Lawn Care Services Mowing and Fertilizing in New Castle, PA

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      • #4
        If you had say, $100,000 cash, what would you do with it?


        What would you do?
        Money should not be the issue or the amount, is what you are doing working and turning a reasonable profit. Numbers and amounts are just that, will the investment generate the cash flow to make it worth while.

        If for example in excavation I see an excavator for $100,000, does it fit what I do, can it do things better than what I have, can it generate more cash per hour than the equipment I use, in my case I know the answer is no, I would take the $100,000 and invest in three excavators that fit my target market, now do I have the business to support it, in my case, not yet, I could support two additional units in this size range, do I have operators to run them I am condifent with etc.

        Its a bit of an open question, can you be more specific?
        Andy
        Halifax, Nova Scotia

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        • #5
          $100,000,000

          1. Big arse truck, like hugeeee!

          2. All my crew will dress in combat gear LMFAO, look like henchmen.

          3. Have a secret underground lair which I will install a super computer who can answer all my questions and greet me every time, "Good morning Scott, what shall I work on today?" SEND ALL THE TROOPS OUT TO MOW SOME LAWNS... I'd call *her/the interactive computer* BREEZE... LMFAO

          "BREEZE, FIND OUT ALL THOSE INTERESTED IN LAWN SERVICE. I WANT A 1000 mile perimeter search!"

          Breeze will say, "Yes master Scott"

          sooooo worth the money, so so worth it, and you know it!

          Comment


          • #6
            Nothing specific. I was just making a general statement.

            And I totally agree that its not about buying a $100,000 machine unless there is a use for it. I think I would have to agree that you have to buy what is "right" for you at this particular time. With me, I have wondered if I would be better off to pay off my debts (they total about $100,000) and then take my income and have it to go forward that way I know I don't have the mortgage to worry about. I don't have more than just the typical expenses: utilities, etc...

            If it were only to be spent on a business I would start out with redoing the building I have which I think would run about $20,000 to get it to the specs I would want to be able to work at all temps (insulation, concrete floor, bathroom (not sure if it would be a public bathroom), certain pertinent tools, and then place the rest in a fund for ordering parts, products, and for reserve fund.

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            • #7
              With me, I have wondered if I would be better off to pay off my debts (they total about $100,000) and then take my income and have it to go forward that way I know I don't have the mortgage to worry about.
              This is such a great topic because it deals with money management.

              Money management is something that I think drives a lot of people crazy. We are talking about big figures here but what if it were simply $1,000. If you were to give some of your friends or family $1,000 each, how many of them would be able to just bank it and hold on to it?

              I think most would find that it was burning a hole in their pocket and they would need to spend it as soon as possible. Why though? Why do we get this immediate urge to go and spend as soon as we have a few dollars saved up? And to buy what with it?

              I am intrigued by this topic. Every once in a while I will watch some of those money management shows and people will call in with similar questions.

              I think there are a bunch of issues that have to be considered, like the interest on the debt and the interest you can make with your money.

              What I like seeing is when people can take a certain amount of money and put it in the bank, in a cd or some sort of relatively secure investment and get comfortable with the fact they have money. Where they can get over that initial spasm to spend it somewhere. Then once you have some saved, a unique phenomenon may over take you. You just might find you want to save more. The it becomes a game, how much can I save.

              So if I had $100,000 in debt and I came into another $100,000. I think I would bank it and get used to it being there and try to save more. I would pay my debt off slowly over time. It would help keep me in check with my spending.

              If I paid it all off at once, I might think, ok what can I now buy? What can I get that is bigger, better, faster. I might not even think of why I need to replace it other than just because I have no debt at the moment.

              What's your take on this?
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              • #8
                Steve that is very true. I think I would have to pay off at least half of my debt just to get the interest knocked down. If nothing else I think I would double my monthly payments to eliminate the debt quicker. That is just a thought. I think I would do well to place at least $20,000 out of a $100,000 into a secure savings account. This would last me a while at my current cost of living, though should I need it for medical expenses, we all know this would not last long....

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                • #9
                  Nothing specific. I was just making a general statement.

                  And I totally agree that its not about buying a $100,000 machine unless there is a use for it. I think I would have to agree that you have to buy what is "right" for you at this particular time. With me, I have wondered if I would be better off to pay off my debts (they total about $100,000) and then take my income and have it to go forward that way I know I don't have the mortgage to worry about. I don't have more than just the typical expenses: utilities, etc...

                  If it were only to be spent on a business I would start out with redoing the building I have which I think would run about $20,000 to get it to the specs I would want to be able to work at all temps (insulation, concrete floor, bathroom (not sure if it would be a public bathroom), certain pertinent tools, and then place the rest in a fund for ordering parts, products, and for reserve fund.
                  My suggestion is you have $100,000 cash, 1/3 towards debt, 1/3 savings and 1/3 expansion, this way everything wins and you have 30 grand for a rainy day.
                  Andy
                  Halifax, Nova Scotia

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Don't get me wrong. I currently do not have a $100,000 to spend. Not even $1,000!!!! lol But doing it in thirds does sound like a good idea.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My suggestion is you have $100,000 cash, 1/3 towards debt, 1/3 savings and 1/3 expansion, this way everything wins and you have 30 grand for a rainy day.
                      I think that is great advice.

                      I also think people in general tend to be comfortable with a certain amount of spending. Usually it's the point where they live hand to mouth. If they have $100 bucks in their pocket it will be spent and there will be nothing left over.

                      That's why I like the idea of just trying to keep the money in the bank for a certain period of time to teach you that you don't have to spend. You can save. It's very hard mentally to do.

                      A lot of times, I will see people come into money and they will blow it in amazing ways.

                      One friend had sold his house and was going to buy another one but first he wanted to take the money he made from selling his house and pay off his car loans and credit card debt.

                      He did and bought another house shortly afterwards. He had spent almost half the money he had made from the house sale and now put a lot less into the new house and now house a higher mortgage. He also quickly rang up his credit card debt.

                      See I think he just can't function without having a certain amount of credit card debt that he is comfortable with having. He needs to be $10,000 + in credit card debt or he doesn't feel like he is spending enough.

                      If he would have just taken that money from the house sale and put it into the new house, he wouldn't have been able to do anything else with it and blow it, but he just couldn't help himself.

                      Having a certain amount of credit card debt gives him some level of panic that he seems to need, then he needs to focus on saying ok I gotta watch this and keep paying it off. He is kind of like a debt addict. He would say he isn't but he is. He needs that constant reminder from the credit card company to say you owe $X of dollars otherwise he will be out spending more.

                      So my point of all this is, get used to saving first. Get comfortable with it. Realize you can save. Then once you can get comfortable with it, consider paying off your debt with the money, until then, try and save.
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                      • #12
                        That is a very interesting thought there Steve. I suppose you are correct about that. I think our society as a whole is addicted to debt.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That is a very interesting thought there Steve. I suppose you are correct about that. I think our society as a whole is addicted to debt.
                          It's because it's so easy for people to get credit, although much harder in Canada, the debit on credit cards for example is way beyond reason.

                          What bothers me is a lot of the capital being used is coming from Countries that are putting a lot of North American workers out of work as their jobs are being moved to countries with, well, what we might call sweat shops then the capital is being re-introduced back into the market.

                          Mike Moore made some pretty amazing facts on just how much of the capital on wall street is actually held by companies and other countries, his target was the NYSE but it explained a lot.

                          Saving requires decipline and that simply isn't there, people see something they want or think they need and they simply get it.

                          There is not an easy answer to this issue but I do not something has to be done and it's not being addressed, I watch the world markets, not near as close as I used to but I keep up to date, we are far from out of the woods yet.

                          The industry that you and I are in, Entrepueners are the foundation to any economy, always has been and always will be from where I set, problem is it's being lost as many are desperate and everything is getting squeezed.

                          Anyhow I won't ramble on, I do however find it troubling and have since I wrote my Economics Thesis in 1985, I hit at the auto market and if the North American makers didn't get their act together, imports would take control, laughed at by many at the time, look at Toyota for example, not totally sure about the USA but they overtool every major car manufacturer in Canada for the first time last year, Now Toyota when I was grown up was just getting into the game here so to speak but look at them now and are they looking for help??? Not a chance.
                          Andy
                          Halifax, Nova Scotia

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                          • #14
                            Maybe after a few more years of this recession we will get more comfortable with saving again and see the importance of it. Maybe we will get away from this drive of immediate gratification where we feel we see it and we need it now.

                            But then maybe that's something too difficult to control and credit card companies need to limit the amount of credit they extend or risk going out of business themselves.
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                            • #15
                              Maybe after a few more years of this recession we will get more comfortable with saving again and see the importance of it. Maybe we will get away from this drive of immediate gratification where we feel we see it and we need it now.

                              But then maybe that's something too difficult to control and credit card companies need to limit the amount of credit they extend or risk going out of business themselves.
                              At the present rate of our society mentality I don't believe that the mentality toward saving/debt will change at all or at least not quickly. The mentality did not get here over night and it will not go away over night. The addiction to debt is similar to an addiction to anything else.... Alcohol, drugs, tobacco products, P*rn. You name it. Its an addiction. Its the same......

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