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  • owski77
    started a topic New lawn care Biz has exploded!

    New lawn care Biz has exploded!

    First off I would like to introduce myself and say hello to everyone out here. I have been reading this forum for almost a year now and have got some real good info from all of you ! My Name is Matthew I am the owner of LAWNWORKS, LLC Located in Oklahoma city. I started just over nine months ago and it has been none stop since I have grown from just a few residential properties to over 205 residential and 91 commercial properties and 9 -3 man crews . I have been approached by a spraying company about buying them out and it looks like a good deal! With that being said My QUESTION to all of you is there a point where you grow to fast? I have been able to complete all the work on time so far but Is it a good thing to mix spraying with a lawn care biz?

  • Chilehead
    replied
    And just to be clear, you are talking about residential customers not commercial ones right?
    Yes, for the most part. There was one who is a real estate investor....still have him as a client (doing grounds care for his properties).

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  • kslawn
    replied
    owski77, what did you decide on? Are you going go through with it? I'd like to hear how its going and I think personally that the way you grew to as big as you are now, and so fast has to say something...sounds like you got yer sh** together. I know some have concerns about getting to big to fast but if you have a handle on it and your comfortable with where your at and want to get even bigger than I say go for it....

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  • Steve
    replied
    Taking a white collar prospect to lunch to discuss business (i.e. grounds care, outdoor living space install) is part of proper professional business protocol.
    And just to be clear, you are talking about residential customers not commercial ones right?

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  • Chilehead
    replied
    Have you ever taken a client to lunch after a bid? If so, how did that go?
    Yes, several times. Every instance resulted in closing the sale. Most of our clients work white collar jobs. Taking a white collar prospect to lunch to discuss business (i.e. grounds care, outdoor living space install) is part of proper professional business protocol. It validates that you REALLY want to earn their business. No other landscaper I know of does this. Why not? Good question. Either way, more need to educate themselves in business protocol....it goes a long way.

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  • Steve
    replied
    and ready to offer a client lunch if it will close an $8K grounds care contract.
    Have you ever taken a client to lunch after a bid? If so, how did that go?

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  • Chilehead
    replied
    That sounds like a very thought out and structure growth process. It makes a lot of sense.
    Thanks, Steve. We also NEVER try to bid the cheapest ** that's dumb, and destructive to any company. Instead, we have honed our selling skills, know our key demographics we want to target, and knock 'em dead. Presentation is HUGE. When I go to do a quote, I am showered, clean-shaven, in a polo, pleated khakis, dress shoes, and ready to offer a client lunch if it will close an $8K grounds care contract. Not to change the topic, just saying.

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  • Steve
    replied
    That sounds like a very thought out and structure growth process. It makes a lot of sense.

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  • Chilehead
    replied
    I generally aim for 20% - 30% per year. Any more than that, and I risk the possibility of securing work without the personnel to perform it. I generally like to grow to where we are packed with hours working overtime, hire to relieve the long hours, and repeat. This is sustainable.

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  • Steve
    replied
    That is all very interesting and it makes you think about ways you could grow in the future.

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  • kslawn
    replied
    I think that is great insight.

    What is your view on why trugreen didn't get into cutting lawns? Would that have worked well for them too do you think?
    I think they had a lot of growth at the time for spraying and firtilizing so they got out of the mowing and consentrated their time on the spraying. They gave us 150 +/- lawns so I'm sure they got a lot of return business from us to at that time. We pretty much added another crew and I would think they put another truck or two out from the extra business they got from us. I think they would have done good with having mowing crews too. Any company in my opinion should be able too do good with both cutting and firtilizing. I do think though that if you do both on your customers lawns that you can control not only the amount of firt you put down, but also be able to control or schedule when you put it down or cut the lawns so that your not interfearing with each aspect of the business...what I mean is: I've been on lawns before when you know it was just firtilized, and still wet in some cases. Your going to have that from time to time but if you do both firt and cutting then i believe one could schedule and control everything to make things run efficiently and not overlap each service so to speak....

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve
    replied
    I think that is great insight.

    What is your view on why trugreen didn't get into cutting lawns? Would that have worked well for them too do you think?

    Leave a comment:


  • kslawn
    replied
    The thing I wonder is how is True Green doing now with that policy they had used on fertilizing? Do you think they have gotten bigger in your area, smaller, or stayed the same size?
    I think then they had around 6-8 trucks at that office back then and im sure they are still doing good. I havent been in that area for a long time but they are still there, not sure if they are doing work for my old company or not. My old boss sold out a few years back and I think the new owner does some firtilizing himself. The original post reminded me of the situation we had back then with having to double cut etc...I think the OP will do good buying the spray company because he can control it better. I think if your 'just a spray company' (not to step on any toe's here Lol) or 'just firtilizing', you have to make sure you make it green and lush etc so you keep the customers coming, thats what they do. When you look at it that way, its good for the 'just lawn cutting' company too as long as they price it right taking in the growth factor. Back then we wasn't ready or didn't expect that type of growth that fast and got us by supprise...

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve
    replied
    True Green. The deal was True green had some lawn maintenance accounts for cutting too, and they made a deal with each other...they give my boss the lawn maintenance rout
    The thing I wonder is how is True Green doing now with that policy they had used on fertilizing? Do you think they have gotten bigger in your area, smaller, or stayed the same size?

    Leave a comment:


  • kslawn
    replied
    Why do you think they chose to put that amount of fertilizer on the lawns? Do you think that was a good or bad business decision for them?
    I think that as long as the grass was thick and green it was good for them....not so much for my boss at the time. I'm not sure why they put so much on, I guess to make sure they did their part, but maybe they always did it that way...it sucks when the grass grows natrually enough to where you have to spend a little extra time to make it look good, but when you have to cut it twice every time your there because they put that much firt on the lawns its a little rediculess, and no need for it...and a waste really.

    Leave a comment:

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