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  • Good Employees

    How in the world do you guys find people to work in this kind of business? How do you qualify them, how do you find people that want a paycheck, how do you find people who take pride in there work? Man I am so frustrated, most are on drugs, lazy, mess up my equipment, want more money for less work, family issues, drama, etc.

  • #2
    Its hit or miss.

    I had the best luck with military personal. The problem is there only available part time.

    I tried carpenters, roofers, and some were good till they found other work, others thought the work was to hard and the pay was to little.

    Every year I bring on about 5-6 new guys. The ones that last usually just listen and show up. Theyll miss spots and if Im, not on them **** doesnt get done. The ones that work hard, show initiative and do things the right way always job hop.

    Comment


    • #3
      unfortunately the real good employees don't last because they usually have the brains and ambition to either start their own gig or move on to a better career choice.

      if it makes any of you feel better, or at least the younger guys starting out, the problems have always been the same good help has always been hard to find because lets face it no one grows up wanting to be a landscaper especially, no one grows up wanting to be a employee of a landscaper.

      the only difference is there are fewer people today that even have any work ethic.
      the younger generation is screwed.

      there are exceptions to the rule with all of the above but the business is not what it used to be and the economy has created a influx of excess landscapers.

      i still have plenty years to work but i am always looking for other avenues to travel to make a living after being a landscaping/ tree care professional for 28 years.
      i still like doing what i do but it is getting old especially with the excess baggage of employees.
      the sad part is the only two things that piss me off is customers and employees and the day i can make a living without either one will be the day i finally figured it all out.

      Comment


      • #4
        It's impossible, lol.


        BUT

        I have an idea.

        You can make the position more 'interesting'. As the owner, you can come up with a title that would give them more ambition to hold onto it.

        Instead of "grunt" "b*tch" or even "crew worker"... try

        "Class A, Master Level Lawn Manager"

        Holy hell, that sounds good doesn't it?

        -

        Ladies will ask, "what do you do?"

        You'll say, "I'm a class A: MLLM"

        Ladies will respond, "What's that?"

        You'll say, "Master Level... Lawn Manager" as you sip on your martini.

        Comment


        • #5
          I don't have any employees, but when I get to the point where I need to hire someone i'm doing what my lawn care mentor did when he hired me.

          I mentioned it before, but he brought me and another guy in....On our first Monday he told us both "One of you will have a job at the end of the week, one of you won't." I busted my arse, the other guy texted, took his time getting out of the truck...he was just not into it.

          IMO you get two things from this....the guy hires himself, and the guy you end up hiring already set his own bar and can only improve. He can't really slack off because you've seen how he can work.

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          • #6
            I mentioned it before, but he brought me and another guy in....On our first Monday he told us both "One of you will have a job at the end of the week, one of you won't." I busted my arse, the other guy texted, took his time getting out of the truck...he was just not into it.
            I do something close to that in early spring. When we're doing large mulch jobs I bring in 3-5 guys for a few installs. This year I had 2 good guys but one moved 40 miles away to do construction work and the other went awol. They were both hard workers and detailed oriented. You cant teach that.

            That put me into a position of looking for guys in the slow part of the season.

            One of the big problems is winter is unpredictable. If I cant keep the guys busy they find work elsewhere. Then in spring I'm right where I left off.

            I had a real hard working guy for 2 years but hes the type that think hes the boss. Everyone hated working with him. He was rude in front of the customers. Then we finally got into it with him telling me how to do his job.

            Comment


            • #7
              Then we finally got into it with him telling me how to do his job.

              Don't you just hate people like that? Arrogant s.o.b.

              Comment


              • #8
                I take parents background into account when I hire. Odds are if the parents are manual labour types, they have instilled good work ethics into their children.
                I stay clear of Uni students and the like. Real men are a dying breed here in Australia. The current generation have had it way too easy, are demanding and all together useless. Iphones are now considered a body part, and they must check fb every two minutes to survive the day.

                Comment


                • #9
                  How in the world do you guys find people to work in this kind of business? How do you qualify them, how do you find people that want a paycheck, how do you find people who take pride in there work? Man I am so frustrated, most are on drugs, lazy, mess up my equipment, want more money for less work, family issues, drama, etc.
                  I have two great employees. They show up every day ON TIME, work just hard as I do. Never complain. Really great. By the way they are my left and right arm. Never had any luck with anyother 'helpers'

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Its hit or miss.

                    I had the best luck with military personal. The problem is there only available part time.

                    I tried carpenters, roofers, and some were good till they found other work, others thought the work was to hard and the pay was to little.

                    Every year I bring on about 5-6 new guys. The ones that last usually just listen and show up. Theyll miss spots and if Im, not on them **** doesnt get done. The ones that work hard, show initiative and do things the right way always job hop.
                    Sounds like you have been driving around in my truck. Same issues. Thought about an ad in the paper but I am sure I would get all kinds of nuts. Dont have the time to mess with the calls.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      unfortunately the real good employees don't last because they usually have the brains and ambition to either start their own gig or move on to a better career choice.

                      if it makes any of you feel better, or at least the younger guys starting out, the problems have always been the same good help has always been hard to find because lets face it no one grows up wanting to be a landscaper especially, no one grows up wanting to be a employee of a landscaper.

                      the only difference is there are fewer people today that even have any work ethic.
                      the younger generation is screwed.

                      there are exceptions to the rule with all of the above but the business is not what it used to be and the economy has created a influx of excess landscapers.

                      i still have plenty years to work but i am always looking for other avenues to travel to make a living after being a landscaping/ tree care professional for 28 years.
                      i still like doing what i do but it is getting old especially with the excess baggage of employees.
                      the sad part is the only two things that piss me off is customers and employees and the day i can make a living without either one will be the day i finally figured it all out.
                      I was a store manager for many years for a lumber hardware store. At 50 I just felt I needed to do what I always wanted to do and that was to be outside working lawns. My dad was a golf pro and I started out working on grass at a very young age and just flat out loved it. One thought I guess I could do is cut back some where I do not need as much help. Sad thing now at 54 I enjoy the money I am making doing this and have fun at the same time.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It's impossible, lol.


                        BUT

                        I have an idea.

                        You can make the position more 'interesting'. As the owner, you can come up with a title that would give them more ambition to hold onto it.

                        Instead of "grunt" "b*tch" or even "crew worker"... try

                        "Class A, Master Level Lawn Manager"

                        Holy hell, that sounds good doesn't it?

                        -

                        Ladies will ask, "what do you do?"

                        You'll say, "I'm a class A: MLLM"

                        Ladies will respond, "What's that?"

                        You'll say, "Master Level... Lawn Manager" as you sip on your martini.
                        Hey..... Now your talking.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I take parents background into account when I hire. Odds are if the parents are manual labour types, they have instilled good work ethics into their children.
                          I stay clear of Uni students and the like. Real men are a dying breed here in Australia. The current generation have had it way too easy, are demanding and all together useless. Iphones are now considered a body part, and they must check fb every two minutes to survive the day.
                          Man, tell me about it. It is hard for me to understand that at 54 years old I can work harder than 20 and 30 year olds. And it is not just because I own the business, I have always been that way with the places I have worked. My dad was a hard worker so I guess I am doing the same as he.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Man, tell me about it. It is hard for me to understand that at 54 years old I can work harder than 20 and 30 year olds. And it is not just because I own the business, I have always been that way with the places I have worked. My dad was a hard worker so I guess I am doing the same as he.
                            I agree with this. I am 20, and i'm not lazy, nor am I attached at the hip to my cellphone checking facebook statuses all day, when I do lawncare, I work, and I work hard, but my dad is 54 years old, and my god he could work circles around me, I just don't understand it.
                            sigpic
                            Carlisle Lawn Care

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I agree with this. I am 20, and i'm not lazy, nor am I attached at the hip to my cellphone checking facebook statuses all day, when I do lawncare, I work, and I work hard, but my dad is 54 years old, and my god he could work circles around me, I just don't understand it.

                              Im the same.. 24 and prefer to leave my phone in the truck. I have a mexican guy thats 61 and works harder than me.. barely drinks water and doesnt want a lunch break. I think its the junk food we have grown up eating or something. My great grandad had a grip that intimidated when he was in his literal death bed.. <**- zero exaggeration

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