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Would you want your kids working with you?

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  • Would you want your kids working with you?

    If you had children of an age where they could, would you want your kids working with you?

    Odd job good for bonding - Kelley Graves is spending what she plans to be her last summer break at home with her parents. She is determined to make the most of it. Her father, Billy Graves, is a tree surgeon and she is spending her workdays right along side of him. Kelley said she feels it is a good opportunity for father/daughter bonding.

    “We only get to see her a few times during the year,” Billy said. “It’s been a joy having her here.”

    Even though she doesn’t plan on staying with the landscaping business she will take the experience with her. Graves said the job has taught her responsibility and how to handle different situations. Graves is also confident she will one day be able to do all the landscaping on her own home.
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  • #2
    My personal opinion on it and I am not a father:

    If the child is going to be in that industry, then I would let them work for me for they could perhaps take over the business when I retire, or be experienced in their field, but if they don't plan on being in the business, then they must find a different job.

    The reason that I say that is it would be not only a waste to the business as a whole, but also to the child. The child will not learn any real life experience by working for his father/mother unless he is going to stay in that business.

    I know of one local sporting goods store owner that allows their children to work in the store, but before the children can take a manager position in the store, they must work for another sporting goods store (out of state) for a year for they can gain experience and another perspective. The one child went to Idaho for a year, and the other one went to Iowa. They both still work for the store and are managers.

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    • #3
      Quote[/b] ]I know of one local sporting goods store owner that allows their children to work in the store, but before the children can take a manager position in the store, they must work for another sporting goods store (out of state) for a year for they can gain experience and another perspective. The one child went to Idaho for a year, and the other one went to Iowa.
      Why do you think this is the case? What's your view of why this is necessary?
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      • #4
        I think it allows the child to be able to see how a different store works. It also is kind of a right of passage for them because it makes them work for another company, instead of having everything handed to them

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        • #5
          Good points.

          Tell me this, do you feel you would have been more prepared for business if you grew up in a household where a parent ran a business fulltime and trained you? Or no?
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          • #6
            Yes and no.

            Because you are exposed to the business all the time, but the problem is that you are only exposed to only "that" business. I feel that if a child knows he is going to take over the family business one day then he should take some type of business classes I feel

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