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Scottler
05-06-2009, 03:04 PM
Back in the days when you all were starting out, did you encounter the "Why would I hire you if you're so new?" dilemma?

I'd like to have some way of spinning that into a positive if and when that should arise.

Thanks!

picframer
05-06-2009, 04:01 PM
Back in the days when you all were starting out, did you encounter the "Why would I hire you if you're so new?" dilemma?

I'd like to have some way of spinning that into a positive if and when that should arise.

Thanks!

Never had a client ask, we officially started a little over three weeks ago, now 11 employees and growing. It's not a question I have been asked yet.

The key starting out is to look and act big, you will actually believe you are big and everything will fall into place. It does take some cash to get there however it pays off big time from professional looking shirts & pants to lettered vehicles and trailers, if something needs a little paint to look great then personally we do it. All the equipment is washed at the end of the day, no exception, even the mowers, they always look new and clients like that.

StartALawnCareBusiness
05-06-2009, 04:09 PM
I think everyone's been in that situation.

Many newbie LCOs fall into the trap of lowering their prices to attract customers. In my opinion, lowering your price is a big mistake. Your customers will expect your prices to remain low and will resist when you try to raise them. Besides that, you're simply selling yourself short when you should be making good money.

Instead, arm yourself with knowledge. Obtain the ability to discuss problems with their yards.

Now, you're new and you don't have the experience and knowledge to diagnose a wide range of problems. Instead, pick one or two problem areas that are common to all your prospects. If everyone in your area has shrubbery beds, become a source of information on proper pruning. Learn all you can about proper mulch application. If everyone has clover in their yards, learn proper mowing techniques which will reduce clover production and discuss those solutions with your prospects.

Never seek customers from a position of desperation (i.e. - "I'm new, please let me cut your lawn"). Do the oposite by making them need you more than you need them. If you know more than just how to run a lawn mower over their grass, and you can demonstrate that knowledge to your customers, you will quickly build a roster of profitable customers.

Keith
Lawn Care Business Program (http://www.StartALawnCareBusiness.com)

Scottler
05-06-2009, 07:01 PM
Thanks for the advice, guys.

I was definitely planning on "playing it big", but I didn't know if that was potentially setting myself up for "holy crap it's just you and this is your third lawn?" by doing so.

My fear was that I'd have to try to convince a client that while this is my first season as a serious business, I've been DOING IT for family and friends for 20 years, and I know that if I were the client, I'd laugh that off.

Great advice as usual. Thanks again!

majoe7
05-06-2009, 10:10 PM
Scottler,

You have be cutting lawns for 20 years at family and friends. I think if you took pictures of the jobs you have done and made a small photo album, you could show potential clients the work you have already done and that can take away the tag that you have been a "Professional Lawn Care Spe******t" for a short time. Use it to your advantage when this question comes up. Take some before and after shots. Be BIG and believe in Yourself. Walk the Walk.

John

majoe7
05-06-2009, 10:22 PM
[QUOTE=majoe7;51065 Spe******t[/QUOTE]

I edited this word 5 times and it still shows like this? :mad:

How come Steve? :D

We can't have a title?:eek:

LOL :)

John

Steve
05-07-2009, 12:27 AM
I edited this word 5 times and it still shows like this?
LOL, one of the things the spammers love to promote on here is a drug that is called cial-lis or something like that and those letters are within the word spe******t :) It automatically does that.

Back in the days when you all were starting out, did you encounter the "Why would I hire you if you're so new?" dilemma?

I'd like to have some way of spinning that into a positive if and when that should arise.

Some people if they sense you are new, will want to screw with you. They will figure they can push you around on a lot of things such as price and how much work they want you to do. Just be wary of this.

How do you spin it? Well I would say two things off the top of my head. "Reliability" and affordability. You would be amazed at how many start ups are just not reliable. Show them you are reliable and you will be all set.

Believe in yourself. You can do this.

andyjoneslawncare
05-20-2009, 10:10 PM
I've been away for a while. Time to get back in the game!! This is by far the best lawn business site out there. You mentioned to educate yourself and gave clovers as an example. Great advice. I'm in FL and was wondering if anyone knew of any websites dealing directly with educating ourselves on different aspects of lawns, plants, etc, that I could spend an hour or so a night reading. I'm sure there are plenty out there and I was hoping someone could give me a place to start. I'm also interested in offering a "Florida Certified Yards" (I believe thats what they're called) which is a yard using only plants native to FL which don't need as much water or pesticides and are better for the environment. At first it seemed counter-productive, since these yards generally have little grass (= less mowing) but they'd still need upkeep and the initial installation fee could make it worth it. I think it would be a good niche to offer once I feel confident in educating people about it. Anything "green" seems to be in demand and if it helps our streams, bays, and oceans, its a win- win. Any thoughts? Thanks! Andy
PS, Is this the best place to post this question or should I have started my own thread? I'll wait a couple days before I repost somewhere else.

Steve
05-21-2009, 08:22 AM
Hi Andy,

I'm in FL and was wondering if anyone knew of any websites dealing directly with educating ourselves on different aspects of lawns, plants, etc, that I could spend an hour or so a night reading.

As far as I can remember I think there are a couple of forums that focus on florida lawns specifically but I don't remember the address.

I bet if you do a quick google search, you will find a lot of information on the care of Fl. lawns.

If anyone else here from FL wants to jump in and offer some advice, please do.