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tomcat172002
04-14-2009, 10:45 AM
Does anyone know about a good commercail grade weedkiller. I have used roundup but that stuff takes forever to work. One landscaper told me in passing about Predator weedkiller but I don't know where to find it? Or I have heard about Lesco weed killer. What do you guys recommend?

StartALawnCareBusiness
04-14-2009, 12:50 PM
Does anyone know about a good commercail grade weedkiller. I have used roundup but that stuff takes forever to work. One landscaper told me in passing about Predator weedkiller but I don't know where to find it? Or I have heard about Lesco weed killer. What do you guys recommend?


First, a few questions:

1) Do you have your applicator's license?

2) What are you trying to kill?

3) Where are you trying to kill it? Describe the landscape: proximity to water, surrounding vegitation you don't want to kill, etc.

Keith

tomcat172002
04-14-2009, 02:04 PM
No I don't have an applicators license. Ususally I put down a weed killer before I put down mulch. So the weeds don't come through. Its not by water or a ground well. I saw burn out which is an all natural product but I am not sure how well that works. Its by a pine tree thats about it.

lukus223
04-14-2009, 02:04 PM
Good questions! I was wondering some of the same things. In Oregon you don't have to have an applicators license if you are not using restricted chemicals and you don't advertise the service or itemize it on the invoice. It has to be included in the LCO services. I'm always freaked out about using anything more powerful then plan old roundup or off brand round up. I don't want to damage or poisen anything. I only use the "ground" clear products if it is in a rocked area with no vegitation near by.

StartALawnCareBusiness
04-14-2009, 05:24 PM
Tomcat:

I would seriously suggest calling your local Agricultural Extension office to check licensing requirements in your area. The EPA is (rightfully so) becoming more fanatic about unqualified commercial chemical application.

As Lukas stated, there may be loopholes in the way you bill. I don't know if what he said is right or not but I've always found that loopholes get closed quickly and there are many traps involved that you may not realize. For instance, if you are transporting a chemical to be used for commercial application you likely need to carry a MSDS within your vehicle along with proper personal safety gear and, possibly, a placard on your vehicle.

I'm really not trying to be preachy here but I have literally observed companies receiving $1500 fines for improper commercial application and/or transportation of lawn chemicals as innocuous as RoundUp.

Back to your original question: RoundUp is a short-term solution to weeds under mulch. Landscape fabric, proper mulch selection, and proper mulch depth is a much better solution.

Good luck and let us know what you find out:

Keith

mark123
04-22-2009, 09:49 PM
Tomcat:

I would seriously suggest calling your local Agricultural Extension office to check licensing requirements in your area. The EPA is (rightfully so) becoming more fanatic about unqualified commercial chemical application. ... Good advice. Call a qualified applicator if you need it before you can get your own applicator's license.

lawn-guy
04-22-2009, 11:33 PM
dude just get some round up pro it starts to work in 24 hours if you want some thing that will last longer mix it with a little peramitol(sp) and there are several brands of these chemicals you can get just use common sence when u spray

mark123
04-23-2009, 08:43 AM
I know you guys don't care but if someone that is a licensed applicator sees you spraying a customer's property they probably will turn you in (I know I would). As long as you can handle the fines do what you want. Watch out for applying near or on wetlands. Once you know all the trouble you can get in you'll see why licensing and continuing education is so important. You also will most likely have to be insured against improper application.

There is no harm in calling your county extension office and it just might save your business. Laws vary from state to state.