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View Full Version : Book Excerpts: Chapter 4 – Selling


Steve
03-28-2007, 05:17 PM
Beginner Mistakes from our friend Jim of promower.net (http://www.promower.net) http://www.gophergraphics.com/images/jim-small.jpg

Excerpts from "Earn $300 a Day Mowing Lawns"

From Chapter 4 – Selling

Quote[/b] ]“Selling property maintenance services is probably the easiest selling job in the world. When you think about it, most
prospects actively seek you – they called you up, didn’t they? And you’re seeking them. So you’ve got desire on
both sides. That being the case, turning contacts into customers often amounts to nothing more than working out the
details – price, specific service, frequency, and so on. Further to the same point, when closing the sale, you don’t
need a death-do-us-part commitment. People can try your service for a week or two or three while risking virtually
nothing. That makes for very easy selling.”
....
On estimating prices: “Many beginners rightly perceive the importance of accurate estimates. If you bid jobs too
high, you won’t get many, and those you do get may soon be lost to lower bidders. On the other hand, if you bid too
low you could wind up working hard for little money. So it’s important to get it right.

“What is the correct price for a job? The correct price is a number that is satisfactory to both you and your
customer for at least one season. Your are making reasonable money, and the customer perceives that she is not
being ripped off. That’s the correct price.

“Please don’t write to me asking for a universal scale of correct prices, or a nationwide scale, or a citywide scale, or
even a block-wide scale. Except as you set it yourself, there is no scale. This deal is between you and your
customer – one on one.

“How do you begin [to set your price scale]? Start by setting a minimum price per stop. I don't know where you
live and can’t tell you what this number should be, but it’s hard to see how you can make out mowing lawns these
days for less than $10 to $15 each. This applies even to tiny lots in rundown neighborhoods. If an area won’t pay
even this little bit, advertise somewhere else.

“Most lawns today, especially in suburban areas, are large enough to pay far more than your minimum price. You
can set your scale for these lawns in either of two ways. One method is based on time.... Another method is based
on area....” [Both methods are detailed.]
....
On negotiations: “Suppose you quoted $30 a week to mow the lawn. Mrs. Smith says $25. You can almost certainly
compromise at $27, which should be within your wiggle room. If even that’s too much for her, you might point out
to that $27 is only $2 difference ... only about $50 total for the entire season. If she’s too cheap to go for that, you
might not want this job so much after all.

“Salesman that I’m not, I’ve resolved lots of price objections with a ‘try it’ close that seems to work very well.
‘Mrs. Smith, I don’t know how I’ll come out at $27 a week. It seems low. But if it’s agreeable with you, let’s try it
for a couple of weeks and see. I’ll keep time on the job, and we can talk about it later. Okay?’

“There is nothing to talk about later. Do a good job on her lawn. Charge $27 this season, $30 next season, $33 the
next....”
....

“As your business matures, you’ll probably have jobs you no longer want – distant, difficult, poor-paying. So too
with equipment: The stuff you started with is probably slow and weary. What to do? Surprise, surprise! Worn out
equipment plus bad customers equals a lawn mowing business to sell! Try not to buy one of these turkeys.”


Remember this section is only a small part of chapter 3, to read more please visit promower.net and order Jim's book!