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MarketingJunkie
12-11-2007, 12:08 PM
Hi, I'm new here (referred to this site by a popular marketing message board).

I thought I'd introduce myself with a nifty ideas that's made a Pennsylvania lawn guy rich...

... I think he's rich because shortly after using this idea I gave him, he drives expensive cars, and he's really grown his business ** but he won't take my calls or emails.

Okay, are you ready? Here's what happened.

I was visiting a vendor who repaired my mailing equipment (at the time I was in the postcard mailing business) when I stumbled upon a guy named Barrett. Barrett owned a Chemlawn-type business and was located in the same industrial park.

Barrett gave me the tour and the operation was quite impressive. I remember Barrett actually manufacturing his own equipment.

But like most inventors, he sucked at the marketing.

I asked him what his biggest problem was. Not surprisingly, it was affordable lead generation. Specifically, it was the cost to measure the lawn size. He said it was not ususual to take 10 separate trips just to get a single new customer.

I asked Barrett how he'd feel about never sending an expensive employee out on another estimate again.

As you'd expect, Barrett was now laser focused on me and was INCREDIBLY interested to know my secret.

Here's what I suggested...

... Instead of spending a lot of time and money paying employees to measure lawns, trust the customers and let them tell you the size to maintain.

Here's an idea of how the new pricing plan was to work:

If you have just .25 acres of lawn, your price per month is just $17.
If you have up to half an acre, your price per month is just $47.
If you have up to an acre of lawn, your price per month is just $97.
Over an acre, just give us a call for an exact and affordable plan.

(Actually, I don't remember the prices we brainstormed... I met Barrett more than 7 years ago and my memory isn't as sharp as it used to be. But I'm sure you get the idea.)

Now, just about every home owner I know has an idea of how big a lawn they have. So why not let them do the measuring for you? And while most people I know are honest, some will lie to get a better deal. No problem... just build up your prices a bit to cover those who want the cheaper .25 acre price for his .33 acre lot. In other words, let them cheat ** everyone wins.

The customer wins because they think they're scamming you, and you win because this unique pricing model is going to significantly boost your business. It's a win-win situation... my favorite.

If you liked this idea ** let me know with a small donation, and I'll send you back more business-building ideas in a flash at:
http://www.marketing-ideas.org/Online-Reports (http://www.marketing-ideas.org)

Do you like this business-building strategy?

caseyshields
12-11-2007, 08:29 PM
You can also go on your counties tax collector site and pull up plats of the area. Enter the address in question and double check if the customer was accurate. But don't forget to add in right-of-ways, they are not included in the size of the lot.

FourSeasons
12-11-2007, 08:59 PM
Quote[/b] ]I think he's rich because shortly after using this idea I gave him, he drives expensive cars
Thats a pretty vague statement. If thats true I don't beleive it came frome his system.

Quote[/b] ]I asked him what his biggest problem was. Not surprisingly, it was affordable lead generation. Specifically, it was the cost to measure the lawn size. He said it was not ususual to take 10 separate trips just to get a single new customer.

I asked Barrett how he'd feel about never sending an expensive employee out on another estimate again.

It only takes me one time and 2 at the most. Maybe with a phone call or 2 at the startup.
10 trips for a lawn customer? Thats a little ridiculous to me.

Quote[/b] ]Here's an idea of how the new pricing plan was to work:

If you have just .25 acres of lawn, your price per month is just $17.
If you have up to half an acre, your price per month is just $47.
If you have up to an acre of lawn, your price per month is just $97.
Over an acre, just give us a call for an exact and affordable plan.
Those prices per month I'd have to start selling everything to stay in business. Let alone drive a fancy car. Unless he only talking about cutting once per month.
Still though, I have a $35 minimum.


Maybe I missed something or I'm ignorant but i don't see this working.

Steve
12-11-2007, 10:12 PM
You know, it does make you think though about using satellite images now, especially if you have a larger service area.

I think Keith may really be onto something with the calculator he came up with to do such estimating.

But anyway, thanks MarketingJunkie for your insight. The more minds we have offering ideas the more we will all learn and grow.

Would you like to tell us more about your services?

MarketingJunkie
12-11-2007, 10:33 PM
Quote[/b] (Team Gopher @ Dec. 11 2007,11:12)]You know, it does make you think though about using satellite images now, especially if you have a larger service area.

I think Keith may really be onto something with the calculator he came up with to do such estimating.

But anyway, thanks MarketingJunkie for your insight. The more minds we have offering ideas the more we will all learn and grow.

Would you like to tell us more about your services?
I appreciate the kudos.

Don't get hung up on the pricing. I was just showing you how letting your prospect pick their price can literally turn your business around.

At first, Barrett was skeptical. So I suggested trying it to a small group of prospects before rolling it out. Apparently the test worked ** would love to know ** he never returned my calls or emails.

Does anyone know a Barrett from Happy Lawn in Kennett Square, PA?

Steve
12-11-2007, 10:47 PM
Well it is an interesting marketing angle. I haven't heard it used yet but maybe that's why it worked.

Do you specialize in lawn care marketing or do you work with many industries?

MarketingJunkie
12-12-2007, 11:43 AM
Quote[/b] (Team Gopher @ Dec. 11 2007,11:47)]Well it is an interesting marketing angle. I haven't heard it used yet but maybe that's why it worked.

Do you specialize in lawn care marketing or do you work with many industries?
I'm just a marketing geek specializing in lead generation...

... Getting lawn care prospects is really no different than selling ****.

It's all about matching those with problems with suppliers offering a solution.

Here's how to get alerted about my latest busines-building ideas:
http://www.marketing-ideas.org

LawncareMarketingMagic
12-13-2007, 10:17 PM
I can certainly see how giving the customers some sense of control over the process could be a good mechanism to generate response, but you'd definitely want to allow room for repricing. At the same time, you want to be careful to not get caught up in the 'lowest price' game.

Like Rob, I don't know why in the world it would take up to 10 visits to get a customer. It sounds to me like the guy's problem wasn't lead generation, but his sales process (presentation, offer, closing, etc.).

I do agree that selling lawn care is like selling ****, although I'm not sure you'd want to use the same type of images. No offense, but I for one wouldn't want to see to many of you guys in the buff. http://www.gophergraphics.com/forum/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif

Steve
12-14-2007, 01:57 AM
Quote[/b] ]I can certainly see how giving the customers some sense of control over the process could be a good mechanism to generate response, but you'd definitely want to allow room for repricing. At the same time, you want to be careful to not get caught up in the 'lowest price' game.

Did you happen to see this site? http://www.pricelawn.com

I'd like to know how this is working out for them.