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Greg'slawnandlandscape
03-16-2013, 09:24 PM
Yesterday before my accident I dropped off a load of dirt. The customer asked for a pickup sized load so I quoted 45 for topsoil when I went to drop it off she said that the dirt was not enough and she wouldn't pay 45 for it. I explained to her that that was a truck load 2000 pounds is what I asked to have dropped in also the capacity for a 1500 so after back and fourth arguing over her saying her f150 could hold three times as much I dropped the price because I didn't want to take it home but what do I do if they refuse to pay do I just bite they bullet and take it with me or what I am very good with my prices and never had this happen when the customer tells me exactly how much they want it would have been different if she said can u drop off a load of dirt because that leaves room for a lot of dirt or a little but she specified a pickup truck load. How would you handle this.

Hedgemaster
03-16-2013, 10:04 PM
She DIDN'T tell you "exactly" how much.

She said a "pickup sized load". How much IS that, exactly?

When you bought the soil, did they charge by the yard, or "by the pickup"?

Bulk material is sold in specific measurements for a reason.



Maybe she was just upset because you don't use periods, or comas.

SECTLANDSCAPING
03-16-2013, 10:14 PM
Maybe she was just upset because you don't use periods, or comas.

lol

Dirt is usually sold by the ton. So when she said load you shoudlve converted the sale to tons. Then if she argues with you about it not being a ton. You pull out the weighted receipt. Easy as pie!

Greg'slawnandlandscape
03-17-2013, 08:59 AM
lol

Dirt is usually sold by the ton. So when she said load you shoudlve converted the sale to tons. Then if she argues with you about it not being a ton. You pull out the weighted receipt. Easy as pie!

They load it by scoop two and half scoops is 2000 pounds an trust me it wasn't a little dirt but for now on I will pull across the scale. And here is her exact words from the text " I need a pickup truck bed of dirt" she didn't know I was bringing a trailer she thought I had a pickup and if I had a pick up That was a 1500 i would never over load it with more than 2000 pounds. Thanks for the advice if you have the whieght ticket they can't argue

SNethercutt
03-17-2013, 09:17 AM
I would ask her to go put 3x that in her f-150 and haul it home, and if she does you will spread it free. Otherwise pay what she agreed to.

Her tires wouldn't make it out of the dirt yard. And the oil from her shocks would be everywhere. Not to mention a bent frame.

Make customers be very specific. If they say "I want a pickup bed load" explain a pickup bed holds this much. Then they say OK. You bring them that much and its the end of the story. Sounds to me like she was vague for a reason. Wants something for nothing.

dpld
03-17-2013, 09:25 AM
lol

Dirt is usually sold by the ton. So when she said load you shoudlve converted the sale to tons. Then if she argues with you about it not being a ton. You pull out the weighted receipt. Easy as pie!


i have never heard of soil, mulch or any other product that can absorb or trap water being sold by weight.
it is sold by volume not weight.

anyone who sells soil by weight is ripping people off.

1 cubic yard of top soil averages about a ton in weight and if it was wet it could weight as much as a ton and a half.

SNethercutt
03-17-2013, 09:32 AM
Here you can buy it both ways depending on where you go. Where consumers go its by the size, yard or half yard.

You can get it by weight if you buy straight from the provider, because they have 5 yard buckets and of course that won't fit in a truck.

Although there is a Mexican fella that comes into the yard I use to work at, and puts 5 yards of mulch in a long wheel base f150. But I wouldn't recommend that. His tires were over inflated.

dpld
03-17-2013, 09:40 AM
They load it by scoop two and half scoops is 2000 pounds an trust me it wasn't a little dirt but for now on I will pull across the scale. And here is her exact words from the text " I need a pickup truck bed of dirt" she didn't know I was bringing a trailer she thought I had a pickup and if I had a pick up That was a 1500 i would never over load it with more than 2000 pounds. Thanks for the advice if you have the whieght ticket they can't argue

i never heard that term "scoop" before referring to how they load a truck.
they use a loader to put the product on your truck not a "scoop" and loaders come in various sizes ranging from a half yard bucket to a 10 yard bucket and bigger.
most landscape suppliers use machines that have 1 yard buckets to better measure how much product they are giving you because the bigger the bucket they use there is more room for error in giving people more product then they are paying for.

i could put 2,000lbs of weight on a passenger car but that does not mean i would do that and a 1500 series truck is not rated to carry a ton and it does not mean you can not get a ton in it but you will end up destroying the trucks suspension and pretty much beating the crap out of it.

a 1 ton truck is a 3500 series truck.

it appears that you and the lady take the advertisements on tv for trucks quite literally.

did your accident by chance involve brake failure ?

ratchetmaster2
03-17-2013, 09:52 AM
she wouldn't pay 45 for it.

45.....DOLLARS?

Are you kidding me?

dpld
03-17-2013, 10:22 AM
45.....DOLLARS?

Are you kidding me?



that is what i was thinking, i don't if you and me are thinking that for the same reason but either way charging 45.00 is ridiculously low and refusing to pay 45.00 for someone you put through the trouble that would not have been bothered if you did not call in the first place is as low as the dirt you dumped on the ground.

i know prices vary from state to state but they can not be that far off.
good quality top soil in my area cost about 30.00 per cubic yard and the minimum delivery charge is 50.00 regardless if you only want a wheel barrow load delivered.

and by real top soil i don't mean any old crap sub soil dirt ran through a screening machine that gets passed off as top soil for a discount.

wat5150
03-17-2013, 11:43 AM
I always pay and charge by the yard. have never bought anything by tonnage. Dpld makes a very valid point. Are you picking up your mulch or dirt in the rain?? If so your getting boned if your paying by weight.

dpld
03-17-2013, 11:58 AM
I always pay and charge by the yard. have never bought anything by tonnage. Dpld makes a very valid point. Are you picking up your mulch or dirt in the rain?? If so your getting boned if your paying by weight.

you don't even need to do that in the rain because once a pile of screened soil gets wet it takes days to somewhat dry out and even if covered it will suck the water up like a sponge from the bottom up.

Greg'slawnandlandscape
03-17-2013, 02:14 PM
that is what i was thinking, i don't if you and me are thinking that for the same reason but either way charging 45.00 is ridiculously low and refusing to pay 45.00 for someone you put through the trouble that would not have been bothered if you did not call in the first place is as low as the dirt you dumped on the ground.

i know prices vary from state to state but they can not be that far off.
good quality top soil in my area cost about 30.00 per cubic yard and the minimum delivery charge is 50.00 regardless if you only want a wheel barrow load delivered.

and by real top soil i don't mean any old crap sub soil dirt ran through a screening machine that gets passed off as top soil for a discount.

I paid 25 for the load after I felt like a low ball because I had to drop price I only had to drive three miles from the dirt yard to her house it was more of a bonus for the day because I was in the area. For anyone confused it was sold per scoop and each scoop whieghs 800 pounds.

And some one mentioned a 1500 couldn't hold that and that was my point the max payload with driver and passengers is like 1800 so I told her I was delivering more than she could haul

Snethercut that's exactly what I told her an her neighborhood is hilly no way she would make it

Dpld the trailer wa within whieghtt limits I don't have a pick up yet the accident happend after I was unloaded I was hit from the person behind me ( sorry this sentence sounds rude it's not supposed to be well no of them are)

SECTLANDSCAPING
03-17-2013, 02:22 PM
I paid 25 for the load after I felt like a low ball because I had to drop price I only had to drive three miles from the dirt yard to her house it was more of a bonus for the day because I was in the area. For anyone confused it was sold per scoop and each scoop whieghs 800 pounds.

And some one mentioned a 1500 couldn't hold that and that was my point the max payload with driver and passengers is like 1800 so I told her I was delivering more than she could haul

Snethercut that's exactly what I told her an her neighborhood is hilly no way she would make it

Dpld the trailer wa within whieghtt limits I don't have a pick up yet the accident happend after I was unloaded I was hit from the person behind me ( sorry this sentence sounds rude it's not supposed to be well no of them are)
Sounds like your price was to low to begin with. Shouldve been something like $40 for dirt, $30 for delivery, and $20 to dump it. Thats still low but you wouldve made out with something.

That scoop doesnt make sense. Never heard of it just yards and tons.

JeffK26
03-17-2013, 04:45 PM
Scoop has been a term here for a couple of years.

In my opinion it's to rip people off that don't know what cubic yards are.

conversation I had last year after paying for 3 yards of mulch and going to the loader with the receipt.

me:"3 yards of mulch"

Nursery: "3 scoops it is"

Me: "no, 3 yards, I paid for 3 yards of mulch and that bucket is not one yard."

Nursery: "You paid for 3 scoops, you'll get 3 scoops."

Me: " no thanks, I'm getting my money back and going somewhere else."

They were charging the going rate for mulch per yard, I paid what I would have paid for 3 yards anywhere else within a couple bucks so I didn't think anything of it at the point of sale, but would have gotten half the amount of mulch. Got my money back and never went back.

Steve
03-18-2013, 12:55 PM
The customer asked for a pickup sized load so I quoted 45 for topsoil when I went to drop it off she said that the dirt was not enough and she wouldn't pay 45 for it......... How would you handle this.

Could you use a word order or some type of purchase agreement in the future? Just something simple to say the customer has ordered X and wants it delivered?

Also, if it is not enough dirt, why not just offer to sell her more? Would another load make her happy?

Greg'slawnandlandscape
03-18-2013, 04:18 PM
Could you use a word order or some type of purchase agreement in the future? Just something simple to say the customer has ordered X and wants it delivered?

Also, if it is not enough dirt, why not just offer to sell her more? Would another load make her happy?

No she wanted more dirt for the same price

willshome
03-18-2013, 05:29 PM
selling it by the truck load that's a new one
What size bed 6' 6.5' 8' ?
Are you trying to be a supplier?
I charge the same dropped or spread

Greg'slawnandlandscape
03-19-2013, 08:13 AM
selling it by the truck load that's a new one
What size bed 6' 6.5' 8' ?
Are you trying to be a supplier?
I charge the same dropped or spread

I'm not trying to be a supplier the trailer is 8ft by 5 so it would be like a 8ft truck bed. It was also holding more whieght than a pick up ha payload

Greg'slawnandlandscape
03-31-2013, 09:34 AM
I just gave another quote to a new customer for 130 for 5 yards of dirt. I have a few questions.

1. I was told one yard of dirt whieghs 800-1000 pounds is this correct it seems like a low number to me

2. Was this a low price I can get one yard for $10 or for free from the housing developers

3. Shoud I sub out the job. All the customer wants is for the dirt to be dropped off. The contractors will drop dirt off for 40 per dump truck load. My question with this is will I make me look bad to say Ill drop it off and then have someone else do the work

SECTLANDSCAPING
03-31-2013, 09:48 AM
I just gave another quote to a new customer for 130 for 5 yards of dirt. I have a few questions.

1. I was told one yard of dirt whieghs 800-1000 pounds is this correct it seems like a low number to me

2. Was this a low price I can get one yard for $10 or for free from the housing developers

3. Shoud I sub out the job. All the customer wants is for the dirt to be dropped off. The contractors will drop dirt off for 40 per dump truck load. My question with this is will I make me look bad to say Ill drop it off and then have someone else do the work

a yard of dirt is 2000-2500 pounds. More or less depending on moisture.

You have to look at it. Sometimes fill is ok other times you have to get topsoil. I just did a job and the fill was $8 a yard, screened top soil was $12 and the better dirt was $16 a yard. I used the medium top soil in this case it was just to fill in a pool.

SECTLANDSCAPING
03-31-2013, 09:51 AM
Your still undercharging. If you get a actual yard of dirt your trailer will be maxed out. You will have to take 5 trips. A yard will way down a 3/4 ton to the tires.

Greg'slawnandlandscape
03-31-2013, 11:26 AM
That last load I did was only 2 thousand pounds for 2 and a half yards. Something does not seem right the numbers arnt matching.

Sect landscapeing

I'm getting a bigger trailer this week so it won't be many trips maybe 2 at max

SECTLANDSCAPING
03-31-2013, 11:38 AM
look at the bucket that loads it. The bucket on the right is 1 yard.

http://wheatonmulch.com/img/mulch-comparison/2-4-yard-bucket-small.jpg

Theres no way your putting 2.5 yards of dirt in a 2000 GAWR trailer. Mulch would be pushing it but it could be done.

I think hes getting you with that scoop nonsense at 700-800 pounds a scoop.

Greg'slawnandlandscape
03-31-2013, 02:45 PM
Thier bucket was smaller by alot

SNethercutt
04-01-2013, 08:53 AM
Ask him what size bucket he is using. I think he is getting over on you.

We weighed a yard of topsoil at a place I used to work at. It came out to 2,230 dry. I know the consistantcy from place to place is different. But a yard will weigh in the neighborhood no matter where you are. And your trailer is probably a single axle by the size you gave us. No way your getting 2.5 yards on that trailer and making it to where your going.

A yard is 27 cubic feet. Build you a 27 cubic foot box and load the one scoop of dirt you buy into it. See how much it fills.

Your state should regulate people selling things by weight and quantity. To keep business from ripping people off. I know down here you have to register your scales for business use with the state if your using them to determine cost of a product.

If he is screwing you he is screwing everyone and I would report him. If he is selling by the scoop nothing you can do unless you ask him how big the scoop is and he lies.

There is a place down here that sales mulch at $22 a yard. They load with 4 yard buckets. You go buy 2 yards they give you more like 3.5 the loaders don't care. They make the same hourly no matter how much they load. But they make sure not to under load you because the state will get on that @$$

Von Bobbeh
04-01-2013, 01:33 PM
45.....DOLLARS?

Are you kidding me?

Yeah I laid out 3.5 yards of "three way topsoil" @ 65.00 each I buy the sh!t for 27.96 / yd and that's as low as I'll go if I'm doing the hauling.

ratchetmaster2
04-01-2013, 01:39 PM
Yeah I laid out 3.5 yards of "three way topsoil" @ 65.00 each I buy the sh!t for 27.96 / yd and that's as low as I'll go if I'm doing the hauling.

I agree. It's the cost of the..whatever it costs plus everything else. Then you have to take the time, and fuel, to go get it, then bring it all the way back. While you have a trailer with a full load, you have to drive much more carefully, and you are taking much more of a risk while carrying such a load.

I have no idea how you would make any money from delivering anything (even a bag of mulch from Home Depot) for $45.

Gregslanwandlandscape, this isn't the way to make money for your brand new 2014 Chevy 3500 dually that you want to get.

LawnBoy0311
04-01-2013, 01:40 PM
What weighs more: a pound of bricks or a pound of feathers?

CS-LawnService
04-02-2013, 05:22 AM
i have never heard of soil, mulch or any other product that can absorb or trap water being sold by weight.
it is sold by volume not weight.

anyone who sells soil by weight is ripping people off.

1 cubic yard of top soil averages about a ton in weight and if it was wet it could weight as much as a ton and a half.

All the yards here sell there topsoil by ton mulch and compost by yard

Cashin H&P
04-02-2013, 06:10 AM
This is ridiculous. Are you trying to be a material supplier?

I do not understand your thought process for this job (and you "company") for that matter. Your delivering top soil in a open landscape trailer, you get there and have to spend an hour shoveling the material out of the trailer all for like $65.

Some on please explain to me how this works, because I would NEVER deliver material if I was to it would cost the customer at least $100 for cubic yard when the supply yard will deliver for $50 + the cost of material.


Life is hard, harder if your stupid

LawnBoy0311
04-02-2013, 07:38 AM
This thread is going no where and I love it. These responses are awesome! Keep posting everyone!

Caskey Lawns & Landscapes
04-02-2013, 09:56 AM
Just sel it by the bucket full...5 gallon that is.....easier to measure and keep track of....:cool:

jymie
04-02-2013, 10:19 AM
Worst thing you can do in business is leave money on the table. You should always include a delivery charge, same as the place you get it from, if the customer wasn't happy, she sure would have paid at least 3 times what you charged her getting someone else to do it. She played you, simple as that. You should have called her bluff, rode of with the load, not like it would go to waste, you could use it some where else on a different job.