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Meauxmoney
02-22-2013, 06:04 AM
Im a 16 year old. I live in where a lot of people get their grass cut by a lawn care service. I also have a lawn care service. Im looking for some suggestions on how i can monopolize the neighborhood.

Sprinkler Buddy
02-22-2013, 06:53 AM
Don't get ahead of yourself. Do a great job on the accounts you have now, build a friendly relationship with your customers and more accounts will come naturally with time.

LawnBoy0311
02-22-2013, 07:01 AM
I've heard of some guys on here doing "Neighborhood Special" rates to try to get a bunch of customers in 1 neighborhood. I haven't tried it so I couldn't tell you if it worked for me or not. Maybe something to look into? Offer a small discount because it will cut down on travel time.

patrick6411
02-22-2013, 07:06 AM
Don't get ahead of yourself. Do a great job on the accounts you have now, build a friendly relationship with your customers and more accounts will come naturally with time.

This is the best advice you can get.
Also go door to door. Don't be scared to knock on the door. Dress for the part, don't wear dirty sweating cloths. Don't look like a teenager, the things that your parents say look bad and you say we are old, is the things you need to watch for, you are marketing to people your parents age. Talk educated, act educated, if someone says no, thank them and don't be scared to ask them why. Also ask them if they know anybody that needs your service.
If you plan on attending college use that as leverage, tell the people that you are trying to earn money for college savings, just make sure you plan on attending. (I recommend going!!)

Steve
02-22-2013, 12:05 PM
Welcome to our forum!

I'd say start with one and build from there. Are you mowing your neighbors lawns yet? If not why not? They probably know you and you know them, so why not try and sign them up. Then move on to their neighbors etc...

Greg'slawnandlandscape
02-22-2013, 07:40 PM
well thats how i work i focus on two nieghborhoods at a time. the thing to remember is flyers flyers flyers if you past out flyers every 2 months it shows potential customers that you are serous and will stick around.

brian'slawncare
02-22-2013, 10:16 PM
I, too am 16 and did exactly what you want to do. This will be my fourth season in the biz. What I can tell you is that face to face interactions will do best. Lowball for a little while to get a few starter lawns, then once people see your work and hear your price, they will want you. The following season, you raise your prices. I did this and I now mow a little under 15 lawns a week while still attending a private high school. Go to college and don't let this get in the way. (grades come first, trust me, I learned the hard way) Figure out what the professionals are charging, and undercut them by like $5. This will give people an incentive to go with a 16 year old as opposed to a professional company. When you go door to door, dress up and know what you are going to say. Mention that you are saving for college, they will want to help you out. When you go door to door bring a card or flyer with a price ALREADY ON IT. This is best because they don't want to call. Most of all, ACT PROFESSIONAL. Good Luck!

Caskey Lawns & Landscapes
02-23-2013, 07:13 AM
I, too am 16 and did exactly what you want to do. This will be my fourth season in the biz. What I can tell you is that face to face interactions will do best. Lowball for a little while to get a few starter lawns, then once people see your work and hear your price, they will want you. The following season, you raise your prices. I did this and I now mow a little under 15 lawns a week while still attending a private high school. Go to college and don't let this get in the way. (grades come first, trust me, I learned the hard way) Figure out what the professionals are charging, and undercut them by like $5. This will give people an incentive to go with a 16 year old as opposed to a professional company. When you go door to door, dress up and know what you are going to say. Mention that you are saving for college, they will want to help you out. When you go door to door bring a card or flyer with a price ALREADY ON IT. This is best because they don't want to call. Most of all, ACT PROFESSIONAL. Good Luck!

Don't ever LOW BALL :eek::eek:

That's the worst business decision you could ever make...If your serious about making a living at this you have to charge to make a profit....By low balling you will also end up with all the wrong kind of customers....

patrick6411
02-23-2013, 03:57 PM
Don't ever LOW BALL :eek::eek:

That's the worst business decision you could ever make...If your serious about making a living at this you have to charge to make a profit....By low balling you will also end up with all the wrong kind of customers....

Take this advice!! This man is right!!

brian'slawncare
02-26-2013, 06:11 PM
By low balling you will also end up with all the wrong kind of customers....

99.99999% of the time, you are right. It really depends on the type of neighborhood you are in. I happen to live in a nice neighborhood and fortunately, I have not had many issues. I AM NOT saying to lowball. All I am am saying, is that in order for a 16 year old to get any business, we need to under cut the professionals by a little. Otherwise, they would much rather have a proff. business take care of them. Once you have established a relationship, you begin to raise your prices. It is all up to you, Meauxmoney....This is how my business exploded.

Meauxmoney
02-27-2013, 02:55 PM
Thing I think are not realizing is that being 16 yr old I can't do the same thing that normal lawn care services do to get clients.

djlandscaping06
02-27-2013, 04:28 PM
Don't ever LOW BALL :eek::eek:

That's the worst business decision you could ever make...If your serious about making a living at this you have to charge to make a profit....By low balling you will also end up with all the wrong kind of customers....

I agree 100%! I have a lot of that going on in my area and when I first started I did some myself just to try and get business. The worst thing was I got some of them jobs and turned out by low balling I was losing money and was not worth it. As dougcaskey said we are in the business to make a profit not to lose money. Don't do it anymore they either take my price or they can move on. Don't mean to be mean but that is the nature of the business. You just keeping doing it the right way and business will come your way!

Steve
02-28-2013, 01:16 PM
when I first started I did some myself just to try and get business. The worst thing was I got some of them jobs and turned out by low balling I was losing money and was not worth it.

How did you ultimately handle these situations to turn them around or did you have to drop the customer?

LawnCareMan280
02-28-2013, 05:40 PM
If you do your pricing right and do a quality job and take your time. That's how I got my accounts.

danamalon68
02-28-2013, 06:45 PM
Do a quality job and gain people's trust. Get to know your neighbors/customers on a personal level. I try to greet them by their first name if appropriate. I have been servicing just my neighborhood of about 120 homes for 4 years now. I work a full time 6 day/week job and I do the lawn care on the side. I have used Vistaprint each of the last 4 years and it works great for me. I use magnet advertising from them and place them on mailboxes 2 weeks prior to mowing season. I also advertise for free on our neighborhood Facebook page. Great exposure and it's free! The first year I had about 6 customers and this past year it grew to a high of 18-19. I live in a military town, so customers come and go. The good thing is, not all residents have mowers and a lot of people rent. :D

LawnBoy0311
03-01-2013, 06:19 AM
One HUGE problem with lowballing is chasing yourself to catch up. Here is what I mean:

Prior advice to you was saying to lowball to get customers. He says his business blew up that way. Lets say you do the same. You cut prices to gain customers, and in return, customers refer you to friends and family. All is well, your making money and your business is growing.

Here is where the problems comes in. You cut your prices to the point where you will be losing money. You won't be able to pay for things to be fixed if they brake....this WILL put you out of business. Eventually you will realize you have to raise prices, but the damage is done. Your current customers are referring you BASED ON YOUR PRICE. Your deadlocked because you can't raise prices.

Here is what I would not consider lowballing. A local company charges $35 per mow, and you quote them as $30 per mow. The reason you can cut by $5 is because you have no overhead. I'm assuming at your age your parents are paying the bills for you.

Charge at a reasonable rate and do quality work. I'd say by 18 or 19 you'll have a nice company going for you.

Steve
03-01-2013, 12:07 PM
I use magnet advertising from them and place them on mailboxes 2 weeks prior to mowing season.

How many of these do you get printed? Do you put them out to everyone you want to service or just to customers from your previous year? Also do you do anything specific on the magnet to get the customer to sign up or do you keep it to just have your business name and contact information on it?

LawnBoy0311
03-01-2013, 01:12 PM
From what I understood placing things on or in a mailbox is illegal. Anyone know if magnets are ok?

jymie
03-01-2013, 01:17 PM
Best place for magnets is on metal doors

MontanaBob
03-04-2013, 09:14 AM
Don't ever LOW BALL :eek::eek:

That's the worst business decision you could ever make...If your serious about making a living at this you have to charge to make a profit....By low balling you will also end up with all the wrong kind of customers....

This X 1000

Bill1090
03-04-2013, 10:24 AM
Don't ever LOW BALL :eek::eek:

That's the worst business decision you could ever make...If your serious about making a living at this you have to charge to make a profit....By low balling you will also end up with all the wrong kind of customers....

I agree. I'll admit I was a "lowballer" for my first couple jobs. It wasn't on purpose, I just didn't know my worth. What I did was stopped, took time to find my numbers, and start over. I looked at it like this: I wasn't making money, but losing it. Why not take the money that I was losing and put it towards better marketing. It ended up paying off. I was still paying out, but it was actually going towards something to help move my business in the right direction.

aduttonater
03-04-2013, 10:10 PM
Im a 16 year old. I live in where a lot of people get their grass cut by a lawn care service. I also have a lawn care service. Im looking for some suggestions on how i can monopolize the neighborhood.


Go knock on their door and ask them if they have any plans on getting their lawn serviced. Provide them with a free on site estimate if they'd like.

Steve
03-05-2013, 12:10 PM
I agree. I'll admit I was a "lowballer" for my first couple jobs. It wasn't on purpose, I just didn't know my worth.

How long did it take to reach the point where you realized this? Was there one specific point that really opened your eyes to this?

Grass Doctor
03-07-2013, 08:06 AM
this how i do it
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