PDA

View Full Version : The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly


Mowin4Dollas
12-20-2012, 01:02 PM
I just recently joined this site and this whole scene of "The Lawn Care Biz." I notice everyone always complaining about low ballers, fly by nights, etc. I do not agree with either "business platforms" if you could even call these things a business at all.

I will be starting my "business" this year, but because of my age I can't go and set up a DBA or get insurance. I simply will be a senior in high school starting my business in hopes to grow and go legit in a year or two.

I guess what I am getting to is the more I read, the more I feel like I am going to be hurting the business by even starting. Just wanting to hear everyones two cents.

SHORTY
12-20-2012, 02:00 PM
Just my two cents worth


Learn all you can in school!!!
That way one day maybe you can mow grass because you want to
not because you have to.

SECTLANDSCAPING
12-20-2012, 02:21 PM
theres a difference between inexperience and deliberately price warring. If you know something goes for $200 dont bid it at $100. You could bid $150-$250 and still get it.

I just finished 2 gutter cleaning jobs. I bet I was the lowest because I won it. At the same time 1 job was done at $160 per man hour and the other $250 per man hour. Now I bid these at a $100 a hour, were just productive.

So theres a big difference between coming in low and working for pennys. Someone could of bid that job for $200 and made $20 a hour and been happy.

If you underbid a one day job take it as a lose. If you underbid a yearly contract your done.

There was a big thread on another forum about how a guy won a 35k contract and went out business. It was because it was taking 50 man hours a week to do and when all was said and done he was losing money. It was a 55-65k job and he came in at half. That extra money was the profit.

stevef1201
12-20-2012, 04:14 PM
theres a difference between inexperience and deliberately price warring. If you know something goes for $200 don't bid it at $100. You could bid $150-$250 and still get it.

I just finished 2 gutter cleaning jobs. I bet I was the lowest because I won it. At the same time 1 job was done at $160 per man hour and the other $250 per man hour. Now I bid these at a $100 a hour, were just productive.

So theres a big difference between coming in low and working for pennys. Someone could of bid that job for $200 and made $20 a hour and been happy.

If you underbid a one day job take it as a lose. If you underbid a yearly contract your done.

There was a big thread on another forum about how a guy won a 35k contract and went out business. It was because it was taking 50 man hours a week to do and when all was said and done he was losing money. It was a 55-65k job and he came in at half. That extra money was the profit.

It all comes down to knowing your real cost. Labor, taxes, insurance etc, adding your profit and figuring your time. My expenses are different than yours. My prices are different than yours. I may be 'low balling' you but only because I can do the job cheaper. Now it may be the other way around. But I do detest these guys who have no insurance, junk equipment, and don't do the job. They however only get short term jobs, make their beer money and move on. This is now my 4th year in business, and my accountant said that I might just make a profit.

SECTLANDSCAPING
12-20-2012, 04:22 PM
It all comes down to knowing your real cost. This is now my 4th year in business, and my accountant said that I might just make a profit.
If you know your cost you should always make a profit. I wouldnt wait around 3 months to make money, let alone years.

Matther777
12-20-2012, 05:46 PM
Hey man I am in the same boat. I am not official yet but I am working on that for this season. I am only 20 so I can understand the young age thing. My advice is scope out the other company's prices. What you can do that the low ballers can't is offer quality service. Take your time then the customers will realize his prices are higher but he can get the job done the way I want. I hope this helps.

Mowin4Dollas
12-20-2012, 09:02 PM
Absolutely! Thanks for all the input guys! Keep it coming! I will only be running without this stuff for one season. Lord willing. I just hope it all works out!

turf&tree
12-21-2012, 05:50 AM
Are you going to get business insurance? One rock through a patio door can cost you a weeks worth of those $ 20.00 mows. Are you going to get any education in your new profession? I guess I am asking is this for the long haul or just until you figure out what you want to be when you grow up?
Don't mean to be hard on the new guys, just tired of getting work stolen every year and having to wait till they decide it's too hard and quit.

LawnBoy0311
12-21-2012, 07:30 AM
Heres my 2 cents.

Mow grass, don't smoke it. Be cool, stay in school.

Mowin4Dollas
12-21-2012, 07:46 AM
I will be a senior in High School next year. I will be dual enrolling at Cleveland State Community College. My plan is to have this business to get me through college, and to get me out of the house as soon as I am out of high school.

My plan for my education is to go to a community Jr. college my first two years. I am doing this because, it will be paid for and I will be able to transfer to a local university and have a little less college debt than I would if I went to the University my Freshman and Sophomore year.

I plan to major in Business Administration and get my MBA. If I am able to take any Horticulture classes I will.

Mowing and outside work is something I just thoroughly enjoy. My best memories are out on a mower with Dad or on a local farm I work out doing grounds keeping. Plus, I make my own hours, decisions, prices, control my profit, and control my success. I can control my success, my quality, and my life, it is by far the best job I have ever had.

Steve
12-24-2012, 10:13 AM
I think you are going to have a great future. All that education is going to serve you well.