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xandrew245x
09-10-2012, 09:06 AM
I was wondering if any of you guys use an outdoor wood furnace to heat your home?


I currently have a boiler and hot water baseboard that runs off of heating oil, and man that **** is expensive.

An outdoor wood furnace would work great for heating my house and my hot water, and on top of it I could heat my garage without feeling bad about wasting excess money, hell I could even heat my pool!

Just wondering if anyone uses one, if you like it or not or could recommend any brands to me.

dpld
09-10-2012, 09:33 AM
i looked into them and loved the idea especially when i get all the premium firewood i could want for free.

the problem i have had is here in my state NJ the towns are in a all out campaign against them and have passed ordinances prohibiting them.

i am certain that is not the case elsewhere and probably pertains to my home state that we appropriately call "New Germany" and i was very disappointed that i was not allowed to use one.

i have done a lot of research on them and the BTU's that they put out is enormous and you can get units that have enough output that you can heat your house, garage, swimming pool and driveway at once with one single unit.

they are very efficient as well as you can hook up a secondary fuel to them where if you ran them out of wood or could not get out to it to reload it, it will switch over to keep the heat flowing.

they also get more time out of each load then traditional means of burning wood and overall are not much more then a furnace for your home.

i would say if you can use one where you live to go for it and as i said if i was not prevented from using one i would have had one years ago.
my buddy has one and he says it is the best thing he has ever done in regards to heating his home and when i visited him in january his home was so hot he had to open windows to cool it down.

i thought that was pretty funny because anyone who uses oil or gas would not be in that kind of position without putting themselves in the poor house not to mention that when you are paying for the fuel you have a tendency to keep the heat on the low side rather then the high side.

good luck with that.

xandrew245x
09-10-2012, 10:00 AM
i looked into them and loved the idea especially when i get all the premium firewood i could want for free.

the problem i have had is here in my state NJ the towns are in a all out campaign against them and have passed ordinances prohibiting them.

i am certain that is not the case elsewhere and probably pertains to my home state that we appropriately call "New Germany" and i was very disappointed that i was not allowed to use one.

i have done a lot of research on them and the BTU's that they put out is enormous and you can get units that have enough output that you can heat your house, garage, swimming pool and driveway at once with one single unit.

they are very efficient as well as you can hook up a secondary fuel to them where if you ran them out of wood or could not get out to it to reload it, it will switch over to keep the heat flowing.

they also get more time out of each load then traditional means of burning wood and overall are not much more then a furnace for your home.

i would say if you can use one where you live to go for it and as i said if i was not prevented from using one i would have had one years ago.
my buddy has one and he says it is the best thing he has ever done in regards to heating his home and when i visited him in january his home was so hot he had to open windows to cool it down.

i thought that was pretty funny because anyone who uses oil or gas would not be in that kind of position without putting themselves in the poor house not to mention that when you are paying for the fuel you have a tendency to keep the heat on the low side rather then the high side.

good luck with that.

There was an ordinance in my township that it had to be 200' of every boundary line, but that changed in january when some old people were elected out. Now there is no laws against them.

I know exactly what you mean, when I am not home I keep the temperature as low as I can, and when I'm home I keep it just warm enough that I don't freeze, but I would love to just walk into a nice warm cozy house once.

stevef1201
09-10-2012, 11:05 AM
Now realize I am talking about a small 1 bedroom, 1 bath, open kitchen living room house. About 800 SF. This was a friends house when I lived in Fairbanks AK. He had a wood buring stove, one that you can get right now, he would stoke it at night, and the place was HOT. when he got up in the morning throw a couple of logs on, open the damper some, and make his coffee right on top. He would also use the thing for making his breakfast. He used about a cord of wood every two or three weeks, and beleive me when I tell you it was far from 'warm enogh to keep from freezeing'. Now of course the insulations was great, so keeping it warm when it was around 50 below was not real hard.

Properly operating wood stoves cost less and are more effectiant than coal or fuel oil.

xandrew245x
09-10-2012, 11:35 AM
Now realize I am talking about a small 1 bedroom, 1 bath, open kitchen living room house. About 800 SF. This was a friends house when I lived in Fairbanks AK. He had a wood buring stove, one that you can get right now, he would stoke it at night, and the place was HOT. when he got up in the morning throw a couple of logs on, open the damper some, and make his coffee right on top. He would also use the thing for making his breakfast. He used about a cord of wood every two or three weeks, and beleive me when I tell you it was far from 'warm enogh to keep from freezeing'. Now of course the insulations was great, so keeping it warm when it was around 50 below was not real hard.

Properly operating wood stoves cost less and are more effectiant than coal or fuel oil.

I know a couple people around here that have outdoor furnaces and love them.

They said during our typical winter they only use 3-4 cords of wood a winter.

Around here even if I bought the wood, that is only $50-100 a cord, much cheaper than the $1600 I paid to heat my house last winter.

dpld
09-10-2012, 12:35 PM
I know a couple people around here that have outdoor furnaces and love them.

They said during our typical winter they only use 3-4 cords of wood a winter.

Around here even if I bought the wood, that is only $50-100 a cord, much cheaper than the $1600 I paid to heat my house last winter.


plus don't forget the fire is not in your house and neither is the smoke and ashes.
the outdoor furnaces give you the best of both worlds in having a home feel like a traditional heating system without all the muss and fuss of the stove being in your house.

plus the outdoor furnaces can get up to 36 hours out of each load so you don't have to deal with stoking the fire throughout the day.

my friends that have wood stoves homes smell like smoke and that gets old after a while as well as it can cause issues with breathing over the years.

Steve
09-10-2012, 02:38 PM
There had been a couple of members in the past that used them. One I think was using wood pellets as the fuel source so he could have it automatically feed the fire as needed.

Another I think just used wood and the outdoor heater was set a way back from his home.