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View Full Version : Using a slice seeder


sunsetlandscaping
07-15-2012, 08:31 AM
I want to rent a slice seeder this fall, and try it on my own lawn before I tackle a customer's. I am overseeding a decent amount of area, and was wondering if I still had to put straw over the area, since the seed is not laying on the surface, like an ordinary broadcast spreader would. Any insight would be appreciated.

Godslapper
07-15-2012, 08:46 AM
I used that thing to plant at least 5 tons of seed over the years. Never once did I use straw.

When you use it make two passes to make either diamond or square shapes. If the grass is wet in the morning you should wait untill it drys. The seed can stick together and clog the tubes. It works pretty good.

sunsetlandscaping
07-15-2012, 10:06 AM
Back in late Spring, I gave an estimate to a guy for overseeding, but I included the cost for straw. But, I told him the best time is to wait until fall when the air is cooler but soil temps. are at a moderate temp still. I might go back and redo his quote and use this slice seeder instead, it might actually come out cheaper for him considering I didn't throw in the price for all that straw and he will not have to pay me for raking it up too.

brian'slawncare
07-15-2012, 11:43 AM
you don't need to use straw because the seed is actually "sliced" into the ground...Make sure to cut the lawn really short before doing this

Also, about raking up the straw- when you apply straw it should be a thin enough layer that all you need to do is mow it over a few times. If you have to rake, that means you put too much down

Apex Lawn & Landscape
07-15-2012, 12:00 PM
When dealing with customers I like to sound like I know what I'm talking about...correct me if I'm wrong but isn't this process called slit seeding!?

brian'slawncare
07-15-2012, 12:04 PM
i have heard it called both. I prefer to call it slit seeding though. Just personal preference.

shadrach
07-15-2012, 12:30 PM
I would use "slit seeding" or "power seeding" over "slice seeding" but all three are fairly commonly used.

brian'slawncare
07-15-2012, 05:23 PM
as long as you explain to the customer the process, they'll understand- no matter what you call it