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SECTLANDSCAPING
09-22-2011, 12:33 AM
I need a bigger truck for landscaping and snow removal. I been watching prices and they tend to vary. I seen 88s for $6000 and 97s for $3500. I havent looked at them all so I couldnt tell you about the condition of each. Either way I have a budget of $8000 for the truck and plow. A lot do come with plow but I would also need the sander.

How would you feel about a 25 yr old dump truck that has been used to plow? I know there heavy duty but at the same time thats abuse and age. A few that I did look at had to much rust for me to feel comfortable footing that type of money for. I seen f250s/f350s without the dump in better condition but the dump is real important to me at this point. I want to use this truck for commercial properties only. I have a smaller truck for driveways buts its limited with some of the work I do all season.

What should I be looking at besides break lines, transmissions, etc? I would like a diesel but I know a lot less about them and they can be difficult to start in the winter.

bruces
09-22-2011, 07:23 PM
what size truck do you want-need ? whats your expected miles per year on the truck ? are you able to do basic maintenance on a truck,or are you going to have to have a shop perform everything for you? are there any brands you prefer over others ?

SECTLANDSCAPING
09-22-2011, 10:04 PM
what size truck do you want-need ? whats your expected miles per year on the truck ? are you able to do basic maintenance on a truck,or are you going to have to have a shop perform everything for you? are there any brands you prefer over others ?

Well I just did 6 dump runs of brush today and it looks like I have 6 more to do tomorrow. So I would say big! Can you find the truck in the picture below?

I need a 8x12 bed that can carry up to 5 yards of mulch in the spring also. Looking at f350, 3500s, and the f450 I loved was sold before I could come up with the cash. Stupid net30.

I might only drive the truck 5-8,000 miles a year.

I can do breaks, plugs, oil, typical wrench stuff and some wiring. No welding, engine overhaul anything you need a lift for. If the transmission goes I would have to bring it to a shop. I could do the starter, alternator on the spot.

Brands dont really matter but ford seems to be half the market here. I seen a few GMC, Chevy, but not many. Ford seems the easiest to find a parts truck for.

The Cleaning Doctor
09-22-2011, 10:23 PM
I like the older trucks because they are easier to work on. Get one without all the computer controls and crap that seems to break at the wrong time. As far as diesels go they are not hard to start in winter. I live in Montana and it gets much colder here. Block heater helps with this. You are aware, I hope, that if the GVW is over 10k pounds you need a CDL right?

Maybe get a truck with no dump bed that is in good shape and then one that is scrap with a good dump bed and make one out of them.

Another thing about diesels is I would go for a mid 80's dodge. That particular Cummins has no equal. At 23 mpg you will save a lot on fuel and also be easier on the motor because of all the torque it has.

Now if I were in your shoes, I would look long and hard to see if I could make it through this winter with what you already have. Why? Because this is the wrong time of the year for the buyer. Spring is a better time for you to buy as you will get better deals.

SECTLANDSCAPING
09-22-2011, 11:34 PM
In a way I lose money every time I show up to a job to big for my truck. With the dump I could of knocked that brush job out in a day. I spent as much time driving back and forth as I did working.

I been looking since spring. I spent $700 on delivery charges in April alone. I just havent found something that I had to have yet. I could get a 3/4 ton then add the insert but that seems more expensive. I found some non dumping flatbeds for a good price but I want that button bad.

Not sure if I need a cdl or not. The hardest part would be finding someone to bring me (and truck) to the test.
this is from the dmv website
A commercial motor vehicle can be defined as:

Vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 or more pounds
Vehicle designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver
Vehicle designed to transport 11 or more passengers, including the driver, and used to transport students under the age twenty-one years of age to and from school
Any vehicle transporting hazardous materials which is required to be placarded.

The Cleaning Doctor
09-23-2011, 10:38 AM
What do you mean take you to the DMV for the test? Didn't they just walk down the street after dropping you off to get a bite to eat? ;)

Steve
09-23-2011, 12:28 PM
I have a budget of $8000 for the truck and plow.

In a way I lose money every time I show up to a job to big for my truck.

For those in the same situation that are on the fence about this, how long do feel it should take a lawn care business owner to pay off such a truck upgrade if they are doing it right?

SECTLANDSCAPING
09-23-2011, 12:31 PM
What do you mean take you to the DMV for the test? Didn't they just walk down the street after dropping you off to get a bite to eat? ;)

If that would work.:) I looked it up as long as the trailer is under 10,000 and the trailer/truck combo 26,000. I dont need a CDL. My trailer is only 6,000 so Im good money.

Its a raining today gonna go check out a old truck. Its another 88 dont know the make but ill find out soon.

SECTLANDSCAPING
09-23-2011, 05:12 PM
I looked at this truck today and its leaking tranny oil from this hose. Is this a cheap fix? I couldnt really follow the line it gets lost behind the engine. There is another line next to it that could be replaced at the same time.

The rest of the truck is in good condition. The plow and dump both work. New hydraulic pump on truck and new piston on plow.

bruces
09-23-2011, 05:53 PM
thats just a cooler line,a monkey can fix that in a few minutes for well under $20.00 .I am not a ford guy,but around here they are the only pick-up manufacturer thats geared for commercial use ,the local dealerships are open untill midnight for parts and service ,while the chev and dodge dealerships parts and service are closed at 4;30 .The older ford diesels [non-powerstroke '94 and older ] are a superb unit with many lasting over 750,000 with few issues .If I was buying a diesel pick-up ,they are the only ones I would want .I would not buy a powerstroke as they fed my family very very well for many years .
The dodge cummins is the only other pick-up truck diesel I would ever concider ,the only drawback to them is the rest of the truck falls apart due to the weight and power of the engine .I am a factory cummins certified mechanic ,and I wont be buying one , not because of the engine ,but because of the truck .
The old gm diesels unfortunately are piles of crap ,too bad because I am a factory trained gm guy ,but these engines fed my family very well too .I wont be buying a newer gm diesel either .
That red truck you posted looks like a fine entry level unit ,I worked on hundreds of units like that,very simple straight forward and economical in the long run .

SECTLANDSCAPING
09-23-2011, 06:53 PM
thats just a cooler line,a monkey can fix that in a few minutes for well under $20.00 .
I cant find the part for that, any other names it would go by? Do you know what the line runs parallel to it is also?

This truck is a 460 gas and hes asking $2500 b/o it comes with 8ft fisher plow. If its a easy fix I might jump on it. I was thinking it was going to be a headache like routing a break line. I might buy the part and put it on to make sure its not bigger then just that. If its that easy.

Steve the truck could pay for itself by spring. That is why I budgeted 8k cuz I know I can recoup it fast.

bruces
09-23-2011, 07:13 PM
its a transmission cooler line,it goes to the rad ,you can remove it yourself,measure the length ,and get a new line in the same bin where brake lines are kept in your local auto parts store .Make sure the ends match the old ones .You will need some fluid as well .Also the line beside it,is the same thing,one goes to the rad ,the other is a return line from the rad back to the tranny .I suggest you replace both of them as the other is probably in the same condition .Also ,dont just buy rubber hose [you could just to get it home ] because the heat will fry most of the hoses over time from the inside out,leaving your wallet empty as it will ruin your tranny .

Steve
09-26-2011, 04:10 PM
If you get yourself a flaring tool, you can buy some line from your local auto parts store. Cut it, bent it and replace the line.

Look on ebay for flaring tool.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/New-45-Degree-Double-Flaring-Tool-Steel-Brake-Line-/200651570081?pt=Motors_Automotive_Tools&hash=item2eb7c3fba1

http://static.speedwaymotors.com/RS/SR/Product/91089525_R.jpg

Then you will also want a tube bending tool (http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/KDT0/2517.oap?ck=Search_N0914_-1_-1&pt=N0914&ppt=C0022).

http://images.oreillyauto.com/parts/img/large/kdt/orly_2517.jpg

If this transmission line is that rusted, I bet you every other line under there will be rusted, including your brake lines.

It's easy to fix with the right tools and then you can save yourself a lot of money.

You also might want a line cutter. This comes in handy if you do plumbing jobs around your house as well. You can cut your copper tubes with it.

http://image.4wheeloffroad.com/f/techarticles/drivetrain/131_1005_custom_hard_brake_line_basics/27203525+w200/131_1005_04+custom_hard_brake_lines+tubing_cutters .jpg

SECTLANDSCAPING
09-27-2011, 08:25 PM
If you get yourself a flaring tool, you can buy some line from your local auto parts store. Cut it, bent it and replace the line.

Look on ebay for flaring tool.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/New-45-Degree-Double-Flaring-Tool-Steel-Brake-Line-/200651570081?pt=Motors_Automotive_Tools&hash=item2eb7c3fba1

http://static.speedwaymotors.com/RS/SR/Product/91089525_R.jpg

Then you will also want a tube bending tool (http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/KDT0/2517.oap?ck=Search_N0914_-1_-1&pt=N0914&ppt=C0022).

http://images.oreillyauto.com/parts/img/large/kdt/orly_2517.jpg

If this transmission line is that rusted, I bet you every other line under there will be rusted, including your brake lines.

It's easy to fix with the right tools and then you can save yourself a lot of money.

You also might want a line cutter. This comes in handy if you do plumbing jobs around your house as well. You can cut your copper tubes with it.

http://image.4wheeloffroad.com/f/techarticles/drivetrain/131_1005_custom_hard_brake_line_basics/27203525+w200/131_1005_04+custom_hard_brake_lines+tubing_cutters .jpg
I cut 4 inches out of the line and put 3 ft of rubber cooler line in its place. I overlapped the old line. No leaks and drives now. I bought it for $2200 today. Not sure if I'm going to fix it myself. To much time and autozone is real funny with their rent a tool program. They seem to never have the tool I need. Just the other day I needed a impact wrench. The mechanic at Midas said it will only be $75 in labor. The parts would be less. Might just do that to save time.

The break lines werent bad thats the first thing I checked. The other cooler line has to go to. It doesnt leak now but it will. I just temp fixed it to bring it home. Ill post a better picture of the truck. The main issue is a small leak in exhaust and holes in the cab floor. The truck is so old it doesnt need emissions so I dont have to deal with those asses.

I was only really worried about the transmission needing replacement. The truck isnt in good enough condition to sink that kinda money into it. For what I paid the engine could seize next year and ill be happy. The 8ft fisher plow is worth close to $1500.

Steve
09-28-2011, 06:26 PM
I think those transmission lines are pressurized. I don't know what the psi is but if they are, those rubber hoses won't last long. Keep an eye out for them leaking.

SECTLANDSCAPING
10-06-2011, 02:00 PM
I think those transmission lines are pressurized. I don't know what the psi is but if they are, those rubber hoses won't last long. Keep an eye out for them leaking.

It was only so I could test drive the truck. The ones i bought were supposedly good enough to be permanent. I replaced the lines already with metal.

I found a leak in a brake line replaced all of them and the wheel cylinders. Now I just have some holes in the floor and a exhaust leak. I believe its from the manifold. Oh and the engine temperature gauge doesnt work either.

With parts and labor the truck cost $2375. Not to bad for 74,000 miles. She has plenty of power and shifts smooth. Just some rust issues. I was going to undercoat it with paint. Not sure if i should use bed liner, rustkill, rustoleam or what?

Steve
10-06-2011, 05:52 PM
Now I just have some holes in the floor and a exhaust leak.

If you can get under it, you will find it out.

Why not get some sheet metal and cut out the old floor section and either weld or rivet in a new floor section.

Oh and the engine temperature gauge doesnt work either.

You can install an aftermarket gauge from autozone for like $15.

I was going to undercoat it with paint. Not sure if i should use bed liner, rustkill, rustoleam or what?

Grind down as much of the rust as possible and spray it with some rustoleum. You can also get a small mig welder and well in new sheet metal if you really want to work on it.

http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/images/lincoln-mig-welder.jpg

Dragger
10-07-2011, 04:34 AM
For What you have invested in the truck and plow you still have a good bit left from your budget to handle any repairs that the truck may need.

A dump truck is such a time saver and those older ones are very nice in the ability to pretty much always rig it together to get it home if it breaks down , make sure you check the u joints on the drive shaft , have lost a couple of those over the years and its not much fun changing u joint on the side of the road .

Steve
10-07-2011, 07:17 PM
make sure you check the u joints on the drive shaft

What's your advice on the best way to check them?

Dragger
10-08-2011, 04:04 AM
you can just crawl under the truck and clean any mud and caked on grease from the outside of the joint , then grab a hold of it and twist/turn it and look for any play in it. Check the bolts on the end caps to make sure they have not worked loose and that the caps are still tight.and grease the u joints while your down there .