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wellbiz
04-08-2011, 11:59 AM
Hey guys.

Was out doing estimates today. Just looking for any feedback or advice on telling a client you are not interested in the project. I went out and looked at a landscape job that is just a mess. I will spare you the details, but I need to tell the client that I am not interested in the project. To be honest I am slammed with work and it is just to big/complicated to handle right now.

I want to be professional, but would prefer to save face and keep the door open for future projects. Any advice on how to word it.:)

Jay

CHEESE2009
04-08-2011, 12:24 PM
I have been in your shoes a few times.

The trick is to explain to the client how you have other projects which need attention, and to take on this new job would actually be a disaster. You don't have the time, you have too much on your plate. AND you have a card of one of your competitors which you will be giving him.

Don't leave him in the dirt, send him to a competitor. He'll be out of your hair.



Other excuses;

"We had a client who hired us late last year, and we were going to do the job this year. They haven't been answering their phone for the first couple of months so we decided to move on - though, they finally gave us a call last night. If it was a different customer, we would have given up on them - but these people have been with us for x-years and refereed us to x-people."

Steve
04-08-2011, 12:54 PM
Could you bid it high enough where if you get it then it would be worth your while?

wellbiz
04-08-2011, 01:34 PM
Could you bid it high enough where if you get it then it would be worth your while?

Steve, I though about it. But sometimes I have learned you have to be careful what you wish for;)

I wont get into the details, but pretty sure house was a foreclosure. Planting beds were overgrown and someone just took a chain saw to the old shurbs and trees. There are roots and stumps everywere that will need to be removed before I can plant anything. They are very close to foundation and sidewalk and this is only the tip of the ice berg as they say.

Pretty sure I am just going to thank them for the opportunity, but remove my name from consideration stating that after looking at the property is was more involved than I anticipated and I cant take it on right now.

Just curious what others have done.

wellbiz
04-08-2011, 01:37 PM
I have been in your shoes a few times.

The trick is to explain to the client how you have other projects which need attention, and to take on this new job would actually be a disaster. You don't have the time, you have too much on your plate. AND you have a card of one of your competitors which you will be giving him.

Don't leave him in the dirt, send him to a competitor. He'll be out of your hair.



Other excuses;

"We had a client who hired us late last year, and we were going to do the job this year. They haven't been answering their phone for the first couple of months so we decided to move on - though, they finally gave us a call last night. If it was a different customer, we would have given up on them - but these people have been with us for x-years and refereed us to x-people."

Good points. The project is from a lead generator and I know there will be 3-4 other contractors bidding on the job. So they wont be left in the dirt. Thanks for the tips.

The Cleaning Doctor
04-08-2011, 02:36 PM
Bid it high and sub it out.

don't leave money on the table.

wellbiz
04-08-2011, 05:22 PM
Bid it high and sub it out.

don't leave money on the table.

Thanks for the idea. I would bid the job, but I am too busy to take on a project that is going to require this much involvement and the last thing I want to do is manage un-tested subs. I would rather be honest with the client then bring in a sub who messes up the project. My rep is more important than a few dollars.

Jack Rabbit
04-08-2011, 08:46 PM
Be honest with the client. Don't make up things to tell them.

Honesty doesn't mean that every detail of your business is for them to know. Tell them just what they need to know to understand why you need to pass on the job.

Don't use emotional appeals or "sob stories" about how hard it would be for you to do the job. Tell them the facts.

Show your concern that the customer gets quality timely work. Example: "Since I don't have enough time in my schedule to do good work for you on this job I'll recommend my competitor Gopher Haul Landscaping."

Liberty Landscaping LLC
04-08-2011, 11:49 PM
I am with Rabit. Tell them I am sorry but at this time we don't have the time to give your property the attension it would take and that we don't take a job that would not leave the customer 100% satisfied. We appreciate the oppurtunity and we can refer you to someone if you would like. We hope that if a need arises in the future that you would think of us. BLAH BLAH. Don't lie or exagerate like it was mentioned. Just tell them honestly you don't have the man hours to leave the property in prestine condition. Good luck!

Norcal
04-12-2011, 10:18 PM
I agree with Steve but be honest tell them right up front before I give you a bid I am so many days - weeks or months out that way to start your not wasting time even giving them a bid that is to high if they can't wait,if they can wait give them a bid set up more work when your not as busy.

like Steve said bid it high you either take yourself out of consideration without saying your job is to jacked for me to do it or. If you get it it's worth your while