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jasonw
12-26-2010, 11:04 AM
How dose pressure washing do in winter? Dose it kinda die off also or??????

Steve
12-26-2010, 10:13 PM
I am guessing it depends a lot on how could it gets in your area.

Yard Elements
12-26-2010, 11:26 PM
I generally wait until fall/winter to really push pressure washing. Everything slows down a little in the winter, especially during the holidays. In my experience at least.

jasonw
12-27-2010, 10:19 AM
Thats what I'm saying. Seems to me like everything is slower for everyone, even stores are not as packed so that's when they would want their sidewalks pressure washed and what not. I mean it would be madness for me to do something like that right now seeing as we are set to see below freezing temps the rest of the week but I am wandering if I went out and got a cheep little pressure washer if it would pay for its self and then some or if right now is just a bad time.

Yard Elements
12-27-2010, 07:47 PM
Thats what I'm saying. Seems to me like everything is slower for everyone, even stores are not as packed so that's when they would want their sidewalks pressure washed and what not. I mean it would be madness for me to do something like that right now seeing as we are set to see below freezing temps the rest of the week but I am wandering if I went out and got a cheep little pressure washer if it would pay for its self and then some or if right now is just a bad time.

your going to want at least 3000 PSI. I just go a commercial grade engine and pump that is 3300 psi for about $700.00.it does well.

jasonw
12-27-2010, 07:55 PM
your going to want at least 3000 PSI. I just go a commercial grade engine and pump that is 3300 psi for about $700.00.it does well.

Unfortunately I can NOT go that rout as I dont have that kind of money to spend. I may lose a little in the long run by buying a cheaper model but hopefully i will pay for itself and get the ball rolling first. Thus far over the past 18 months all I have purchased has been residential grade stuff from the local Lowes and I am very happy with it, its all paid for itself many times over and still running strong. I know it wont last as long or at least the warranty wont last as long but it is what it is. I had a deal for a huge one last year that took up the bed of my truck but turned it down. I wish now I would have picked it up.

picframer
12-28-2010, 06:25 AM
We offer services as long as the weather allows, we were cutting and chipping trees for example right up to Christmas and we have two more to do as soon as this wind calms down. I did receive a call for pressure washing two weeks ago, the customer was putting Christmas light up and noticed the siding was a mess however that is shut down here, simply too cold.

Sales in retail and other areas are way down. I spoke with my daughter last night as she works at a high end sporting store that had wicked sales yesterday, sales were down a staggering amount. I did notice in the city traffic was a fraction of previous years boxing day sales.

jasonw
12-28-2010, 10:46 AM
So it sounds like pressure washing could be a year round service "weather permitting" can you elaborate on that though? I mean for sure we wouldn't want to pressure wash in sub freezing temps but what other conditions would it be ill advised?

Yard Elements
12-28-2010, 11:15 AM
I pressure wash unless it's below freezing, or snowing. Last year I offered pressure washing and didn't do much of it all all. At the end of this year I have done a lot more. I had a used Honda GX 340 with a general pump and the pump blew on a job so I went and bought a new commercial grade(my last one I bought used). I would assume though that for a while you won't be using it like commercial use anyway. I'm not sure how much experience you have pressure washing but it can be a VERY slow process if you don't have enough pressure.

I do siding, moss on roofs, sides of gutters, walks, patios and decks.

I have been looking for a good way to promote or up sell pressure washing, it's not as popular as my other services but it can be a money maker.

There are also some good attachments to get, I have a 15 in surface cleaner, telescoping wand that extends up to 20 feet, and a few others.

Does anyone know anyway to make moss removal go faster with a washer, on concrete?

jasonw
12-28-2010, 11:30 AM
Yeh I am sure it will be a slow process, especially with the cheap machine I would get stuck with but at this point I am not worried about my $+hours I am more worried about just making my house payment and feeding my kids so as long as I am making money I dont mind it, I am going from working 20 hour days so the long hours dont bug me. I have used one before but only to clean my old car engines and what not, now I have all new cars that dont need all the dirt and grime cleaned off of them but that may just be another service to offer, maybe to local mechanics before they dig in I can pressure wash the engine, who knows.

Steve
12-28-2010, 12:07 PM
I generally wait until fall/winter to really push pressure washing. Everything slows down a little in the winter, especially during the holidays. In my experience at least.

Do you suggest using that in your marketing material? Saying something like 'now is the time to pressure wash your ...... things have slowed down and its a great time to cleanup and prepare for the new year?'

Or do you do something else?

jasonw
12-28-2010, 12:34 PM
Do you suggest using that in your marketing material? Saying something like 'now is the time to pressure wash your ...... things have slowed down and its a great time to cleanup and prepare for the new year?'

Or do you do something else?

Thats a great idea Steve. I get postcards from my mortgage broker several times per year letting me know of new services and interest rates and what not. I have really wanted to do this but we have had to just about cut back on all marketing other than the ad in the paper because right now we just cant afford it.

picframer
12-28-2010, 01:52 PM
There are two products, one is called Moss Buster which you can buy online and the other Moss Be Gone, sprayed on, both will actually fall off in the rain, we spray, give it a day, come back and pressure wash off.

Unless it's say 45 or below we will pressure wash.

The Cleaning Doctor
12-28-2010, 06:04 PM
FYI for commercial jobs they will want the gum removed. Unless you know how, it will require hot water to remove. Cold water and high pressure will damage the concrete.

Go out and sell the job and then rent a pressure washer for the job. I have rented them for as little as $40 for 1/2 a day. You can also rent a surface cleaner which makes it much faster and a hot water unit if you need to.

jasonw
12-28-2010, 06:08 PM
Not a bad idea. I would love to own my equipment but renting one might be a good way to start out.

Yard Elements
12-29-2010, 10:46 AM
There are two products, one is called Moss Buster which you can buy online and the other Moss Be Gone, sprayed on, both will actually fall off in the rain, we spray, give it a day, come back and pressure wash off.

Unless it's say 45 or below we will pressure wash.


Will the moss products kill lawns. I do roofs and driveways close to lawns that always have moss on time thick. :(

picframer
12-29-2010, 12:34 PM
Will the moss products kill lawns. I do roofs and driveways close to lawns that always have moss on time thick. :(

No it will not hurt anything

http://www.mossbuster.com/

Steve
12-29-2010, 05:06 PM
it will require hot water to remove.

What's the best way to created the hot water on a job site?

wdcutter
12-29-2010, 05:55 PM
not sure where your from, but in the winter here some pressure wash logging trucks, semis, etc. as the sand and salt from the roads build up on them. Check around with some local companies that use this type of equipment. Check on a rental unit and maybe you can hook up with a local company and go from there.

They have units with a kerosene heater to heat the water, just have to drain the lines and everything at night so it doesn't freeze unless you have a heated garage.

The Cleaning Doctor
12-29-2010, 07:45 PM
To answer your question Steve, There are pressure washers with heaters built in and there are add on heating units that you can use for a cold water pressure washer. There is a series of tubes that the water flows through and acts as a heat exchanger because they are positioned in the combustion chamber of the burner. Most of the burners you will see are Beckett (in my opinion the best burner out there) and these are identical, except in size, to what you would find on an oil fired boiler.

I used to work on these burners daily in Alaska. You set the temp gauge and when you pull the trigger the burner fires off and heats the water. Most cleaning can be done between 120 and 180 degrees with some systems going well above 200 degrees.

Some burners require 110v AC for operation while others are totally self contained and run on 12v DC for burner operation.

Yard Elements
12-29-2010, 10:48 PM
No it will not hurt anything

http://www.mossbuster.com/
The recommended rate is 3 gallons per 100 sq feet. Thats almost 200 per 1000 square feet, do you use 3 gallons per 1000 square feet?

picframer
12-30-2010, 03:14 AM
The recommended rate is 3 gallons per 100 sq feet. Thats almost 200 per 1000 square feet, do you use 3 gallons per 1000 square feet?

They suggest 3 gallons per 1,000 square feet, we use around 1.5 unless it's really bad then we will use 2 to 3.