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View Full Version : Hello all (newbee with an important question)


roysyardandhaul
09-07-2010, 02:58 AM
My name is Eric and I am new here.
25 years ago I made a run at this kind of living with a 79 Honda Prelude (carried the mower in the trunk) Lawn Bags filled with barkdust tied to the top of the car. no kidding- stuck the rented weed eater out the sunroof.
I was getting 15.00 per hour back then.
My girlfriend spent all the money in the business account (some of it fronted for a job and I went broke and gave up)

Last I year started a Landscape Maintenance business with my father after being laid off of a 6 year 38K - 40K per year job.
I decided that I wasen't going to rely on someone else for employment any longer. So far I have about 25 regular customers and some are year around.

There is so much good information here Im glad I found you all. I hope to share my Ideas as well - I have years of sales,marketing and customer relations experience behind me. In my opinion that is 90% of the job if not 95.

My Goal is 100 clients at an AVG of 100.00 per month in the next 8 years.
That should keep me busy.

What I would like to know is how do you guys know what the avarage price of services are in your area? How would you research this it's not like everyone advertizes their hourly rate.

Any help or Ideas in this area would be great.

Thank You

Eric.

MountainViewGreenskeeper
09-07-2010, 07:26 PM
Use your yard or neighbor/freinds yard and have a few companies come out and bid the maintenance on it.

Personal sugestion you dont want to be the most expensive but you dont want to be the cheapest either. Find what and where works best for you.

Steve
09-08-2010, 11:11 AM
Hi Eric,

Welcome to our forum!

When you are giving your price to the customer, can you tell by reading them if you are over or underpricing yourself? Their reaction and their decision to give you the job or not should be the ultimate guide to what you can price your work at.

If that fails, you can always do what was mentioned in the previous post.

I have years of sales,marketing and customer relations experience behind me. In my opinion that is 90% of the job if not 95.

What would you say are the 5 most important lessons you have learned when it comes to those things?

roysyardandhaul
09-08-2010, 02:07 PM
What would you say are the 5 most important lessons you have learned when it comes to those things?[/QUOTE]

That's easy,

1.Always listen to your customer (they will tell you how to close them+they will give you the objections you have to overcome)
2.Always make them feel that they are the most important client you have.(because they are)
3.The "Law of Averages prevail" ( more estimates more business)
4.Find common ground and make friends before firing your number. ( If they like you they will buy from you)
5.Follow up , Follow Up,Follow up - (untill you get the job or they tell you to "go jump in the lake) - If you loose one job it dosen't mean that you have lost all the jobs they need.

One more.

All of this begins the second you answer the phone.

Your right about watcing their reaction btw - thinking about it again it dosen't really matter what the other guy is charging. When I was selling cars I never cared how much the "other car" was my customer always bought the best car on the lot. - The only thing that really matters to me is how to grow my business and reach...no exceed my goal.

You have a good site here and it will help me get there.
It reminds me of who really got rich in the gold rush era?

The gold prospectors? no

It was the one selling the tools.





Thank You.
Eric.

djmadmattr
09-09-2010, 01:55 AM
Lawns in my area go for $20 small (30 min),,,,$25 med (40 min),,,,$30 hour big so that comes to a minimum of 40 hour one person max. 80 hour for two quick people. You stick by those numbers and you should be fine. charge different rates per hour based on lawn size that's my trick you make less the bigger the lawn is not more. So long as your clients live close to one another:cool: anymore and people's attitude toward there nice lawn guy changes and you will lose them.:mad:

Steve
09-09-2010, 11:57 AM
5.Follow up , Follow Up,Follow up - (untill you get the job or they tell you to "go jump in the lake) - If you loose one job it dosen't mean that you have lost all the jobs they need.

I have read stories about how involved one can become in following up. One story stood out in my mind on how a car salesman would send a birthday card every year to a customer who bought a car from him. He would also get as much information as he could about the customer and their family to ask about them the next time he heard from the customer.

When you say follow up, follow up, follow up, how involved do you think this process should get? Should it include the above concepts? Should it include more? What's your thoughts on it?

From the Ground Up
09-09-2010, 05:45 PM
Hi, my name is David and I've been interested in lawn maintenance my whole life. I'm 18 years old and really want to pursue a career in the yard business. I have bout 20 year round regular customers and anything that a veteran could give to a rookie would be very appreciative.

Steve
09-10-2010, 01:54 PM
Hi David,

Welcome to our forum!

20 lawns! WoW! what kind of marketing do you do to attract all those customers?