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View Full Version : Baby steps, lots to learn


RedmondSnowRemoval
01-04-2010, 07:05 AM
Well hello everyone, I'm a 17 year old kid with a
thing for snow and plenty of ambition to get things
going . I'm currently in the works of piecing together
a plowing service, right now I have an atv with a 4 foot blade
and have access to a vehicle capable of plowing , it's a 2002 dodge ram 1500. I'm only focusing on residental accounts right now so I don't need a professional set up, just something that's worth the money and reliable. Any words of wisdom are appreciated.

Steve
01-04-2010, 10:40 AM
Welcome to our forum!

That is fantastic!

What have you been doing so far to promote your services?

RedmondSnowRemoval
01-04-2010, 01:37 PM
As of right now, its word of mouth, i am going to put some fliers in this and near by neighborhoods. Its a work in progress, but i really would like to plow with my truck, i don't have any knowledge about plowing nor the set up. I only know what i leaned for installing the plow on my atv. Any brands too look at , stay away from?

Steve
01-05-2010, 12:13 PM
I'd say, what ever you got to work with, I'd work with.

What kinds of responses have you been getting from others once they know you are offering snow plowing services?

arthur712
01-05-2010, 01:42 PM
Welcome to the forum!!

CHEESE2009
01-05-2010, 02:48 PM
Well hello everyone, I'm a 17 year old kid with a
thing for snow and plenty of ambition to get things
going . I'm currently in the works of piecing together
a plowing service, right now I have an atv with a 4 foot blade
and have access to a vehicle capable of plowing , it's a 2002 dodge ram 1500. I'm only focusing on residental accounts right now so I don't need a professional set up, just something that's worth the money and reliable. Any words of wisdom are appreciated.


Plowing doesn't necessarily fly when it comes to people choosing snow removal services.

The best you could do with a plow is push the snow further into a driveway, or with your ATV, you may be able to push the snow out & onto the street, but then where does it go?

Depending on some of the storms we have in Canada, shoving the snow against the curb will just not work.

As for an ATV, there are laws against driving them on certain roads. If that may be the case in your area, you'd have to haul it job to job by the means of another vehicle.

If you do snow removal in the more open parts of town or country, an ATV would probably be legal, & you will most likely have more areas to push the snow. Not guaranteed.

If you would be able to find a reliable snow blower, & be able to transport it by truck & ramp, you would be better off.

The things you have to look at are;

Efficiency, Expenses, & profit, vs working for another company (McDonalds).

With the way you tackle a job, is it going to be more profitable & maintain it's security, or will you have to really lose sleep & stress out to make the money you want.

When I started off with Lawn Service, I thought I was doing so much & receiving so little. I wasn't even making minimum wage. Though the problem wasn't anything other than finding customers.

The problem with snow removal revolves around time, & the lack of it. Snow removal is a time for rushing & getting the most done in the least amount of time = profit.

It's hardly worth it if you have to sacrifice your health.

Even at my young age, from doing strenuous work I have felt my heart tense up & cause me grief.

Labor is 20% of the problem, 80% of it is stress. Gaining & maintaining a customer base that I can profit from, paper work & scheduling, keeping everyone happy while sacrificing my own happiness, sleep deprivation, having too big of a work load. It's possible to eventually manage, but it's not something to be proud of.

I know I can manage 50 customers, though I always think about how much more work am I doing just to beat having any minimum wage job?

Running a business means sacrificing everything you once knew, & leading almost a double life inside of the business. You will have to do everything, become 2 people in order to make your business take flight.

You are not hired to do labor alone like other jobs, which takes the fun out of the business for the first little while. Though being independent for most is almost worth the cons we will all face.

M&A Lawn Care
01-05-2010, 03:17 PM
Well hello everyone, I'm a 17 year old kid with a
thing for snow and plenty of ambition to get things
going . I'm currently in the works of piecing together
a plowing service, right now I have an atv with a 4 foot blade
and have access to a vehicle capable of plowing , it's a 2002 dodge ram 1500. I'm only focusing on residental accounts right now so I don't need a professional set up, just something that's worth the money and reliable. Any words of wisdom are appreciated.

I am eighteen years old and have been doing lawn care and landscaping for several years. I took some time off last winter to go exchange ideas with my brother inlaw who owns diamond in the rough lawn care and snow removal. He lives in vermont. From my experience with him and helping him with snow removal. I would suggest looking at walkbehind snow blowers if you are just doing driveways.

Steve
01-05-2010, 06:00 PM
When I started off with Lawn Service, I thought I was doing so much & receiving so little. I wasn't even making minimum wage. Though the problem wasn't anything other than finding customers.

Can you tell us more of what you mean by this?

RedmondSnowRemoval
01-06-2010, 08:45 AM
Plowing doesn't necessarily fly when it comes to people choosing snow removal services.

The best you could do with a plow is push the snow further into a driveway, or with your ATV, you may be able to push the snow out & onto the street, but then where does it go?

Depending on some of the storms we have in Canada, shoving the snow against the curb will just not work.

As for an ATV, there are laws against driving them on certain roads. If that may be the case in your area, you'd have to haul it job to job by the means of another vehicle.

If you do snow removal in the more open parts of town or country, an ATV would probably be legal, & you will most likely have more areas to push the snow. Not guaranteed.

If you would be able to find a reliable snow blower, & be able to transport it by truck & ramp, you would be better off.

The things you have to look at are;

Efficiency, Expenses, & profit, vs working for another company (McDonalds).

With the way you tackle a job, is it going to be more profitable & maintain it's security, or will you have to really lose sleep & stress out to make the money you want.

When I started off with Lawn Service, I thought I was doing so much & receiving so little. I wasn't even making minimum wage. Though the problem wasn't anything other than finding customers.

The problem with snow removal revolves around time, & the lack of it. Snow removal is a time for rushing & getting the most done in the least amount of time = profit.

It's hardly worth it if you have to sacrifice your health.

Even at my young age, from doing strenuous work I have felt my heart tense up & cause me grief.

Labor is 20% of the problem, 80% of it is stress. Gaining & maintaining a customer base that I can profit from, paper work & scheduling, keeping everyone happy while sacrificing my own happiness, sleep deprivation, having too big of a work load. It's possible to eventually manage, but it's not something to be proud of.

I know I can manage 50 customers, though I always think about how much more work am I doing just to beat having any minimum wage job?

Running a business means sacrificing everything you once knew, & leading almost a double life inside of the business. You will have to do everything, become 2 people in order to make your business take flight.

You are not hired to do labor alone like other jobs, which takes the fun out of the business for the first little while. Though being independent for most is almost worth the cons we will all face.


Thank you very much for the tips, as far as driving on the roads with my atv; I live in a "quad friendly" town where the police will not bother you if your driving responsibility. But i do use my pick up to transport the atv to out of neighborhood places. I live in a rather rural connecticut town, sidewalks are un unheard of peice of landscape. There for theres always plenty of space to pile up the snow. The snowblower is a good idea, matter of fact i do have a small 2-stroke single stage blower, its decent and clears a 16" path.
I Recently read an article on the site that explaned how offering "free" services can help build a network of customers. Where do i start with this, i mean its a small town? The hardware store were i work does attract alot of town folk,i could ask my boss if he wouldnt mind letting me put up some fliers.

In reality i would like to stray away from the quad becasue its somewhat cumbersome to operate and unconfertable in cold weather. My goal is to either purchase a plow set up for my dodge, or buy a vehicle that is designated "just for plowing" possibly an old chevy or ford?

Steve
01-06-2010, 11:46 AM
I Recently read an article on the site that explaned how offering "free" services can help build a network of customers. Where do i start with this, i mean its a small town? The hardware store were i work does attract alot of town folk,i could ask my boss if he wouldnt mind letting me put up some fliers.

What kind of things were you considering to offer? Like possibly offering free plowing to a certain amount of seniors? Or veterans or something else?

RedmondSnowRemoval
01-06-2010, 01:27 PM
I have a lot of senior citizens that live on my street and that go to the senior center in town. I would offer it to them and possible they might spread the word to people that go there as well.

M&A Lawn Care
01-06-2010, 03:31 PM
I would go after the elderly people because they seem to talk to each other a lot. When it snowed here i got a call from an elderly lady who lived in an upper class neighborhood where the homes were close together and have small driveways that are about the same size. I was very familiar with this neighborhood so i was able to give her a price over the phone. By the time I got over to her house she had called her friends in the neighborhood and gave them my number and the calls started coming in. It got to the point that i had to turn people down. So i would defiantly target them as potential customers.

Steve
01-06-2010, 04:27 PM
Could you also contact your town hall? Would they know of some seniors that are in need of help? Or even the senior center?

Then also contact the local paper and tell them what you are up to. Maybe a teacher at your high school could also help you get some media attention. If they write an article on the good deeds you are doing, that would certainly help get you more attention.