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View Full Version : Stupid Chainsaw!!!


CHEESE2009
10-19-2009, 02:30 PM
So I have 2 chainsaws.

One is broken, the other is... "broken"

The better of the two doesn't start easy, I almost smashed it out of frustration.

Any way to perfect the chainsaw without breaking my back?

I got it to start, then the chain wouldn't move, then it shut down & I tried to get it to start again, but failed.

10000's of pulls on the cord & I am done for the day, what a waste.




Anyone know of a good chainsaw that cat cut thick branches FAST?

My old chainsaw took forever to just cut twigs frig, I don't do a lot of chain research, maybe a need a certain or newer chain?

I want something to cut down this hedge/tree, I worked on it at the beginning of the year. I trimmed with a hedge trimmer, but the branches were to big & my chainsaws are crapped out. I ended up snipping some of the branches with wire cutters lol.


Anyway, my question is: What is the most efficient chainsaw which is able to cut thick branches like butter?

justin_time
10-19-2009, 03:22 PM
Stihl ! Get the job done !

lawncrafter56
10-19-2009, 09:27 PM
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the newer Stihl saws... worth every dollar. also always nice to have a half dozen + sharp chains.

Steve
10-20-2009, 01:26 AM
Have you sharpened the blade on your chain saw lately? It can make a world of difference.

SuperiorPower
10-21-2009, 01:11 AM
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the newer Stihl saws... worth every dollar. also always nice to have a half dozen + sharp chains.

Not necessarily... I personally prefer Jonsered and Husqvarna over Stihl. A LONG ways before Stihl.

Stihl has a consumer grade, and a commercial grade. Consumer grades are no better than the average Homelite, Craftsman, or Poulan saw. They just have pretty orange paint on them....

At the moment I am kind of on the fence about Echo and Shindaiwa and that is only because of their recent merger so I am just waiting to see what happens.

Breeze, how much you spend on a chain saw will depend a great deal on how much you are going to use. And most likely, like Steve said, the chain may just need sharpened on the one saw to get it to cut better. It may need a tuneup to get it to run and start better.

good luck,
Eli

Steve
10-21-2009, 05:03 AM
This may sound stupid but what is it about a chain saw hitting the earth that causes it to dull so quickly from?

I would think wood is tougher to cut through than if you accidentally cut into the dirt with a chain saw, so why does it cause so much damage to the blade when it digs into the ground?

jwjtreecareRI
10-21-2009, 07:53 AM
In the grand scheme of things chainsaws are not that expensive so have a back up and pay a professional to tune up periodically. A well maintained sharp saw is the ticket to making money. Pick a good commercial grade company and stick with them (we use stihl). You are likely to get better service if you use one brand exclusively. We often have the local stihl rep at our shop and is available for specific questions. Your chain saw is only as good as your chain. Learn how to sharpen them or find a shop that can do it and carry 3-4 extra. lots of things can dull chains prematurely (dirt, rock, foreign material embedded in the wood, ice, decayed or punky wood) so try to only keep in contact with good wood but you will encounter the other stuff so be prepared.

Steve
10-22-2009, 02:37 AM
and pay a professional to tune up periodically.

Welcome to our forum!

How often do you have your chainsaws tuned up? What is involved with the tune up and what is the average cost of it?

jwjtreecareRI
10-22-2009, 02:42 PM
think of your cutting edge on a chain as a fine wood workers chisel. (it is awfuly close to it) the edge is very sharp and designed for takeing a very specific size chip out of the wood. soil is made up of many things includeing tiny rocks and sand. that is all it takes to dull you chain. if your chain is sharp it the saw will produce small wood chips not saw dust. check out http://www.stihllibrary.com/pdf/SharpAdvice110606.pdf it gives a good back round on chains.

jwjtreecareRI
10-22-2009, 02:47 PM
a chain saw is a two cycle engine and overall is pretty simple. the carborator should be checked and cleaned, air filter replaced, the sparkplug should be checked cleaned and replaced if necessary, and the hi and low idle needs to be adjusted properly. The final one is the most tricky and is why i recomend a professional for the tune up. if there is nothing major wrong with the saw it should only take a pro an hour. maybee $100

StartALawnCareBusiness
10-22-2009, 06:56 PM
I don't do much chainsaw work. But, when I do, I always try to have a couple good files in my tool box.

Also, I always carry a 12 volt chain sharpener. It's a great way to get a quick sharpening job done out in the field.

Steve
10-23-2009, 03:13 AM
How many of you have tried to sharpen a chain saw blade and have been successful?

LOL I have tried many times and I think when I am done, it might be a little better than it was but it's never as good as it was when it was new!

picframer
10-23-2009, 06:14 AM
How many of you have tried to sharpen a chain saw blade and have been successful?

LOL I have tried many times and I think when I am done, it might be a little better than it was but it's never as good as it was when it was new!

We have one Jonsered 2054 and 6 Stihl chain saws, the MS361 is my personal favorite (have the MS260, MS290's also), we have so many as we run three tree clean up crews in the spring and summer, two saws per crew, one chipper per site and a backup saw.

Sharpening is super easy however the key is to get someone who knows what they are doing to show you, once you get it, you will never forget, been sharpening chains for 30 some years now, an older fellow showed me when I was 13, took a few tries but then I had it.

StartALawnCareBusiness
10-23-2009, 02:35 PM
This thread reminded me of an automatic chain sharpener I demoed a few months ago.

Keith


Here's the video:

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Steve
10-24-2009, 05:19 AM
That video is crazy! It's amazing how much work is involved in sharpening them!

Andy, what tool do you use to sharpen them? I have had tried using like a Dremel to do it.

From here (http://www.how-to-home.com/how-to-sharpen-a-chain-saw-using-dremels-chain-saw-sharpening-kit-1453.html).

http://www.how-to-home.com/images/dremel-1453-012.jpg

picframer
10-24-2009, 06:48 PM
That video is crazy! It's amazing how much work is involved in sharpening them!

Andy, what tool do you use to sharpen them? I have had tried using like a Dremel to do it.

From here (http://www.how-to-home.com/how-to-sharpen-a-chain-saw-using-dremels-chain-saw-sharpening-kit-1453.html).

http://www.how-to-home.com/images/dremel-1453-012.jpg

No I use a round file, about 3 to 4 min and I can give you big chips, a new employeem five tries and they will generally get it right.

Steve
10-25-2009, 06:58 AM
How many times can you sharpen a chain saw blade until it needs to be replaced?

picframer
10-25-2009, 07:27 AM
How many times can you sharpen a chain saw blade until it needs to be replaced?

We run ours until there is about 3/16th of an inch of tooth left, as the tooth gets shorter you sharpen more often, mainly due to heat.

Little's
10-25-2009, 10:46 PM
Not understanding Eli's comment, but maybe he can make sense of it. I know that Stihl is the only of the 3 he mentioned that DOESN'T have a consumer grade. Husqvarna is sold throughout Home Depot and Lowes, Not too sure about Jonsered though. Stihl is only sold through dealers and not box stores. Can you elaborate on your comment? Thanks

SuperiorPower
10-26-2009, 10:51 PM
Not understanding Eli's comment, but maybe he can make sense of it. I know that Stihl is the only of the 3 he mentioned that DOESN'T have a consumer grade. Husqvarna is sold throughout Home Depot and Lowes, Not too sure about Jonsered though. Stihl is only sold through dealers and not box stores. Can you elaborate on your comment? Thanks

You are exactly right in that Stihl is only sold through Dealers. I believe, though I am not 100% positive on this, but I believe that Jonsered is sold through dealers alone as well.

But what I was getting at was the quality of the saw, not where they are sold. For the most part you used to be able to tell by the model number whether or not a particular model Stihl was a consumer or commercial grade. It is still relatively easy once you understand their model # designation system.

Example:

Stihl models 021, 023, 025, 029, etc are consumer grade saws (not the model #s are "odd numbers" as opposed to even #s). To my knowledge the MS210, MS230, MS250, MS290, etc are just the newer model designations of the same saws and thus are still Consumer quality.

Stihl models 036, 044, MS360, MS440 are Professional models... These are "even numbered" models and historically this designated Pro models. Just some food for thought when you go to buy a new saw.

To answer Steve's question regarding why chains get dull quickly when you hit dirt and certain other substances, consider this. Dirt is comprised of many small rocks/sand/grit, whatever you want to call it. Essentially these are "sand paper" but just without the paper. When you hit frozen dirt, these grits do not move as easily as loose dirt does and become more like sandpaper. So basically, to answer the question, anything that is grit or contains grit will cause your chain to become dull quickly. Thus if your wood is dirty, muddy, etc. it will quickly dull your chain.

Once you learn how to properly sharpen a chain by hand you should be able to make it just as sharp as it was from new. Depending on how dull it was, and how sharp your file is, it may take anywhere from 2 to who knows how many strokes of the file to sharpen the chain. There is no "it will take this many strokes" to sharpen the chain....

Now regarding how far back to sharpen a chain, I would definitely not recommend sharpening it back farther than the red mark I placed on the photo. I would personally recommend stopping a bit sooner. I have seen chains sharpened beyond this line. Keep in mind that when you do sharpen beyond this red line, that you risk having the teeth break off since there is considerably less strength there to hold the tooth in place. If you choose to sharpen beyond the safe limits I showed, you take that risk on your own.

Good luck,
Eli